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  1. #1
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    Default un problema menos

    Hi Guys,
    This time I need help with a very simple phrse, but believe me I am stuck. How do you express either of the following sentences?

    un problema menos
    un dolar menos
    un empleado menos

    E.G Sb. talks about their problems, and adds that he has already solved one of them. So you reply: A PROBLEM LESS

    It does not sound English

    Thanks,
    Diego

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    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Default Re: un problema menos

    Hola Diego!

    Yo diría: "At leat, one problem solved"... pero, as usual, te aconsejo esperes la sugerencia exacta de un native...

    Hope it helps!

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    Default Re: un problema menos

    Mem,
    Tu sugerencia es perfecta. Gracias

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    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    Default Re: un problema menos

    Diego solo como segunda alternativa te dejo esta opción: "one less problem to solve"


    Truly, my dear young friends, you are a chosen generation. I hope you will never forget it.
    Gordon B. Hinckley

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    Default Re: un problema menos

    Strictly, less applies to singular/non-count nouns and units of measure, and fewer applies to plural/count nouns. But this distinction has begun to fade, and you will find many examples of less used with count nouns. Still, strictly speaking, I think that "one fewer problem" would be considered to be more correct.

    This gets more interesting when you think about the difference between, for example, less serious problems and fewer serious problems. The former means problems that are not as serious in nature and the latter means a smaller number of serious problems.

    I keep thinking about One Less Bell to Answer.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2z0KmhK95Q (Take a little break and enjoy this!)
    This is a Fifth Dimension song from 1970, offered as an example of how this distinction is fading in popular usage.
    Last edited by mariaklec; 04-17-2009 at 09:05 PM.

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    Default Re: un problema menos

    Hebe,
    Thanks for your contribution. Your version is more or less what Mariaklec explained.

    Mariaklec,

    Thank you for your clear explanation.
    Cheers!!!
    Diegonel

  7. #7
    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    Default Re: un problema menos

    Quote Originally Posted by mariaklec
    This is a Fifth Dimension song from 1970, offered as an example of how this distinction is fading in popular usage.
    That is so right mariaklec, that the use of "fewer" in this case even sounded a bit strange at first to me. However I recommend Diego's using the option that is correct from the grammar perspective. Otherwise, Merce's option would be a clever way to avoid any grammar issue.

    Kind regards and nice weekend to you all


    Truly, my dear young friends, you are a chosen generation. I hope you will never forget it.
    Gordon B. Hinckley

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    Default Re: un problema menos

    I'm going with Hebe on this one. One less problem or one problem less.

    "One less problem to solve" or "One less thing to worry about" or "One less worry", "One less headache", etc. are common phrases in everyday English in the US (regardless of their grammatical correctness)

    There are some who put the less after the noun, e.g., one problem less, one worry less, but either way is common and readily understood. .
    Last edited by vicente; 04-18-2009 at 01:07 AM.
    vicente

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    Default Re: un problema menos

    thanks Vicente, so i wasn't that wrong

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