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  1. #1
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    Question bumper sticker

    vi esto en un carro hoy. Y no tengo ni idea de que significa.

    "Yo amo monclovia la bella, que en la tarde polvella."

    Alguien me puede ayudar?

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    Default Re: bumper sticker

    "Polvella" is new to me. I will assume (until my ignorance is pointed out by others) that the bumpersticker reads "I love beautiful Monclova that becomes dusty in the afternoon."

    Note that I write "Monclova" and not "Monclovia". Monclova is a large city in Coahuila. Did you see the car in Mexico? "Monclova la bella" could be translated several ways including "Monclova the beautiful", but "beautiful Monclova" certainly gets the idea across. Note also that the wording is such that the message rhymes.

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    Default Re: bumper sticker

    Could it be "that powders her face" (se empolva)?

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    Default Re: bumper sticker

    Gernt, I like that! I would expect, as you do, the reflexive. Possibly Don Pablo missed it when he jotted down the message. After all, he must be pretty busy being "el Magnífico". A minor detail could have escaped his attention. My guess is that he missed the spelling of the city, but I could (and often am) wrong. "...(P)owders her face" would make sense and go well with the rest of the saying on the bumper sticker.

    If Don Pablo isn't following this, the writer of the bumper sticker could be comparing the city with a woman. "La Bella" is used almost as if part of a royal title such as "Isabela la Católica". A woman powders her face, a city gets/becomes dusty. "Polvo" could be used in both senses: powder and dust.

    Years ago I spent some time in Masaya, Nicaragua. They called dust "nieve café". The joke was the volcanic dust in and around the city was finer than flour, and it got all over your boots, pants, etc. With the possible exception of corrupt policemen (Guardias Nacionales, actually), it was what Masaya had most of.

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    Default Re: bumper sticker

    why yes, it is difficult being magnifico. but since I'm don pablo el magnifico I manage it quite well! ha ha ha

    Well I'm pretty sure I got the message right. And I saw on a BMW here in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    Maybe I'll get a police light for my car and next time I see that vehicle I'll get them to pull over so I can ask them what it means!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: bumper sticker

    could have been Monclovita and not Monclovia.

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