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Thread: Pinche - Good Word???

 
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    Default Pinche - Good Word???

    Can someone give me an example when this word "pinche" could be use as affectionate or in a loving way. I have seen all the normal translations, but I have a gentleman friend that insists that when said to a women it is with love/affection for that person and doesn't alway mean "f ck". I kinda jumped the gun and got upset that he called me a bad name. Any help to get him out of the dog house?

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    En ocasiones, (y sólo con amigas o familiares) es un "cariñito"...

    e.g. "pinche prieta", "pinche chaparrita", "pinche Lupita" (ad nauseam)...

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    It depends on the country:

    The Dictionary of the Spanish Real Academy says:
    PINCHE: Kitchen assistanat (in Spains, for example). In this case, "pinche" denotes less level or degree.
    In Chile, you call "pinche" to the penson who you are in love with or someone who is in love with you, for example: he's my "pinche"
    In Central America, a "pinche" is someone who is stingy or miserly
    In Mexico, it's a bad word, it is an insult.
    In Argentina, Chile or Puerto Rico I think it's simply a hair pin or a pin to securing papers.

    Hope it helps!

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    Context is always important. Even in English sometimes friends call one another names that would produce broken noses and missing teeth if said to the wrong person in other contexts. Wasn't it in The Virginian that we read, "Smile when you call me that"? Name calling, even when done allegedly with affection, is not a habit worth acquiring.

    If you do not like to be called "pinche", I'm surprised your significant other insists on saying it. What is so difficult about respecting your wishes? What part of "No" doesn't he understand?

    You are giving a very strong meaning to "pinche". "Damn", "worthless", "lousy" etc. are probably closer to it in meaning. The origin of the word is scullery maid. This is the newest, least trained, less experienced, most easily replaced member of a houselhold staff. If something is "pinche", it is of little importance or value.

    In Nicaragua and Costa Rica, the meaning is quite different. Here in CR it means stingy or nitpicking (petty). That's far from a compliment, but it's still not as bad as the meaning you give the word.

    If a calm, sincere, heart to heart talk with him fails, you wish to address him as "hijo de put-" or "hijo de la chingad-", explaining that you mean it with great respect and affection. Assuming he doesn't faint, he may get the message. If he doesn't, I'm sure there are lots of other men waiting to put a smile on your face and much more concerned with your feelings than he. There's no need for you to settle for second best.

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    Smile

    Thank you for the replies.

    Thomas - he stopped using the word becasue he knew I didn't understand the translation of it in the manner he was using it. He is very respectful of me - that is why I am thinking I over reacted. I just wanted to understand the word better and get examples of when it is a good/affectionate word.

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