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    Default Please translate this Spanish idiom

    What does a person mean who says:

    Estoy puesto que un calcetín.

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    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    I think it depends on the country. The correct sentence is "Estoy más puesto que un calcetín". In Argentina you can hear "Está re puesto", just that, meaning that he's very drunk for instance.
    I've also heard that expression refering to a particular situation, for example, when you're ready for something, maybe a party, and you say you're ready and dressy-dress to go to that party.
    And I've also heard the same expression when talking about a guy who's very much in love with a girl, SO MUCH in love that his friends say "Está puesto".

    These are some ideas. Let's see what the other members of the forum have to tell us about this. It's very interesting!!

    Regards,

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    Thank you mem286. The person I heard it from was from Mexico, and she was talking about an upcoming trip to India when she said

    Estoy más puesta que un calcetín

    I thought she might mean something like "I'm so excited" or "I can hardly wait", but it is so hard to guess with these idioms.

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    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    That's exactly what she ment!! She wouldn't miss it at all... she can't wait!
    Idioms are neither easy in English but they're very nice to learn... some are really strange, don't you think?

    Regards,

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    Thanks again mem286.

    I agree idioms are often strange. I love them and use them all the time. An interesting old book was "1,000 Spanish Idioms". It bears out what you said about how it may depend on where the person is from. The professor author had surveyed many people in various countries as to whether each idiom was frequently, rarely or never heard. Some were universally used, but other were confined to certain countries, or even smaller areas.

    I also think the meaning of idioms tends to drift over time because it is not to be found in the words, so even native speakers may have to guess. Here's a strange one in English. In Britain, but not in the USA, "Bob's your uncle" means that something is quick and easy to accomplish from here. The hard part has been done or eliminated. But originally it had a definite bitter element to it. The result was sure and soon, and the speaker was less than pleased about that. That bitter part of the meaning has completely disappeared.

    Regards.

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