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Thread: kicked the tyres....

 
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    Default kicked the tyres....

    Hi everyone,

    I have been reading the Guradian just to put myself in the picture about the American bail-out plan. I found this expression the meaning of which I guess is something like "obstruct". Do you agree?
    Thanks everybody.

    The pair have just spent two gruelling days in front of the congressional and Senate banking committees, where US politicians "kicked the tyres" of the proposal.

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Quote Originally Posted by diegonel
    Hi everyone,

    I have been reading the Guradian just to put myself in the picture about the American bail-out plan. I found this expression the meaning of which I guess is something like "obstruct". Do you agree?
    Thanks everybody.

    The pair have just spent two gruelling days in front of the congressional and Senate banking committees, where US politicians "kicked the tyres" of the proposal.
    The Guradian (Guardian?) must be a British publication. "To kick the tires" (tyres is British spelling I think?) is an expression derived from the business of buying a used car...(the buyer kicks the tires to test whether they are road-worthy)...and it means that one is testing an idea, or measuring the soundness of something...sort of like saying "kicking the idea around".
    vicente

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    To "kick the tires" also means that the buyer of the car has no idea of what he is looking at or how a car works but feels that in doing so he gives the impression that he knows all about them.

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Vicente is right (and, yes "tyres" is the British spelling which, as someone from the US, always looks like a child's misspelling) about the origin of the expression. Flaco, are you serious in your expansion of the meaning or were you joking about the competency of politicians in this matter?

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    Default empleado raso

    Guys,

    I appreciate your help very much. I see I misunderstood the meaning. Now it's clear to me.
    I'd like to know how i can say "empleado raso" We can talk about senior managers, managers, bosses,all of whom hold a hierarchical position. But what about those who don't?

    a plain employee???

    Thanks again! DIEGONEL

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    I am not familiar with that term (I feel so stupid sometimes), but from the context you have given, "low-level" or "non-management" employees could work. Low-level sounds a bit harsh, but the idea is transmitted.

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Scottj

    I Don't Think You're Stupid At All. I Sometimes Ask Questions Like The "kick The Tyres" One. And After I Read Your Replies, I Could Feel Stupid For Not Having Infered The Meaning From Context. But I Don't. At Times We Are Smater Than Others And That's Human.

    Regarding Your Version Non-management Or Low Level Employees, I Think It Will Do.

    Thanks Scottj.

    Diegonel

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Quote Originally Posted by ScottJ
    Vicente is right (and, yes "tyres" is the British spelling which, as someone from the US, always looks like a child's misspelling) about the origin of the expression. Flaco, are you serious in your expansion of the meaning or were you joking about the competency of politicians in this matter?
    Scott, "to kick the tires" is an old saying/joke among car dealers and does imply a lack of knowledge on the kickers part as it tells you nothing about the car, where as a knowledgeable person will open the hood and know what he is looking at and do a complete vehical inspection and be able to make a knowledgeable decsion on the car where the "tire kicker" will buy the car simply because it looks cool and how he will look driving around in it.
    Weather this was the meaning of the writter about the politicians I can only guess but would assume it fits in many cases.
    PS, the British also call the hood a bonnet and the trunk is the boot and the windshield is a windscreen.

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Quote Originally Posted by ScottJ
    I am not familiar with that term (I feel so stupid sometimes), but from the context you have given, "low-level" or "non-management" employees could work. Low-level sounds a bit harsh, but the idea is transmitted.
    I like non-management employee...it sounds better than low-level .

    You could also say ordinary employee but I still like non-management better.
    vicente

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Quote Originally Posted by Flaco
    Scott, "to kick the tires" is an old saying/joke among car dealers and does imply a lack of knowledge on the kickers part as it tells you nothing about the car, where as a knowledgeable person will open the hood and know what he is looking at and do a complete vehical inspection and be able to make a knowledgeable decsion on the car where the "tire kicker" will buy the car simply because it looks cool and how he will look driving around in it.
    Weather this was the meaning of the writter about the politicians I can only guess but would assume it fits in many cases.
    PS, the British also call the hood a bonnet and the trunk is the boot and the windshield is a windscreen.
    Sorry to disagree Flaco. Used car dealers might consider this an inside joke but that's not what the expression means.

    I know all about buying cars and how to tell if they are sound or a lemon...and I have kicked plenty of tires. It's a natural thing to do, maybe even a requirement when you are looking at an old car with questionable looking tires. It might not prove anything but neither will opening the hood. A tire kicker can do that too.
    vicente

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