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Thread: kicked the tyres....

 
  1. #11
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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Vicente, this has been my understanding of the term after working in the automotive field for thirty years. I've kicked a few tires myself but for a different reason.

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Quote Originally Posted by Flaco
    Vicente, this has been my understanding of the term after working in the automotive field for thirty years. I've kicked a few tires myself but for a different reason.
    I understand Flaco. Maybe this is a situation where the phrase has one meaning to people in the automotive industry and another to people not involved in that industry. I have never considered it to mean that somebody didn't know what they were doing but I see your point. In any case I suppose you have to know the context in which it is being used.
    vicente

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Probably so Vicente but they do make language interesting and fun but they do need to be used with caution when speaking to the public, just look at how that remark by Obama about lipstick on a pig turned out.

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Quote Originally Posted by Flaco
    Probably so Vicente but they do make language interesting and fun but they do need to be used with caution when speaking to the public, just look at how that remark by Obama about lipstick on a pig turned out.
    Absolutely. Caution is essential...how many times have we heard someone complain that they were "taken out of context".

    You got me to thinking about this and I'm wondering if the difference between our respective interpretations might be simple formation because I agree that if we were in a conversation and you described somebody as a "tire kicker" or "someone who just kicks the tires" I would immediately think of somebody pretending to know what he was doing. On the other hand, if we were talking about an idea or a job and you said "let's kick the tires on this" I would think you meant that we should examine the ramifications or consequences.
    vicente

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    Default Re: kicked the tyres....

    Yeah! This is probably where they come up with the saying " don't listen to what I say listen to what I mean". But it's all fun. It's like the guy who was asked if he spoke any other languages and he said "no, why would I want to be confussed twice?"

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    Default Re: empleado raso

    Quote Originally Posted by diegonel
    I'd like to know how i can say "empleado raso" We can talk about senior managers, managers, bosses,all of whom hold a hierarchical position. But what about those who don't?

    a plain employee???
    I had not heard of the term, but from your description I suggest "rank and file" employee (often hyphenated: rank-and-file). The term originated in the military, from the formation of troops in ranks (rows) and files (lines). Officers were not part of the formation. The term has come to mean the large body of members of any organization, excluding the leaders.

    Example: Recently, Congressional leaders have been trying to raise support for the bailout scheme among the rank-and-file members of Congress.

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    Default Re: empleado raso

    Quote Originally Posted by ronm
    I had not heard of the term, but from your description I suggest "rank and file" employee (often hyphenated: rank-and-file). The term originated in the military, from the formation of troops in ranks (rows) and files (lines). Officers were not part of the formation. The term has come to mean the large body of members of any organization, excluding the leaders.

    Example: Recently, Congressional leaders have been trying to raise support for the bailout scheme among the rank-and-file members of Congress.
    Excellent post ronm! "Rank and file" did not occur to me but it is an apt description of general, non-management employees.
    vicente

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