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Thread: typical terms of endearment in brazil

 
  1. #1
    KRS
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    Default typical terms of endearment in brazil

    How would you say "dad" as opposed to "father"? And "daddy?"

    How about "mom" and "mommy"?

    And what are some typical terms of endearment a father & mother would use towards their son or daughter? Would "menina" be one of them (for a girl), perhaps less common???

    An older adult toward a young adult or older kid?

    Wondering if these things vary so much by region or background/ethnicity?

    KRS

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    Post Re: typical terms of endearment in brazil

    Olá KRS! / Hi KRS!

    Dad = Papai
    Father = Pai
    Daddy = Papai also... Maybe a diminutive can be added? Papaizinho.

    Son = Filho
    Daughter = Filha

    "Menina" and "Menino" can be used by any adult towards teens... same thing with "Garoto" and "Garota". For younger kids usually "Criança" or "Moleque" are used.

    Espero que possa ter ajudado. / Hope this could be of help.

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    KRS
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    Default Re: typical terms of endearment in brazil

    Hello.

    And for "mom", would it be "mamae"?

    Something I'm curious about. I don't know if you have any idea, but... In Japan, they used (& still use) Portuguese words from Portugal. Some examples are "vidro" and "ombro". This was before English words became more dominant after the war. I think their use of "mama" and "papa" comes from Portuguese, though it's a slightly different term. Any thoughts? I'm guessing they took the original term & modified it to fit their way of speech. Does that happen in the reverse? That is, do Brazilians take words from a different language and use or modify it until it becomes part of their own language??? It's fascinating how language evolves...

    Obrigada!

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    Post Re: typical terms of endearment in brazil

    Olá KRS! / Hi KRS!

    Pois é, / Yes, it is.

    Mom = Mamãe
    Mother = Mãe

    Não sabia que em Japão usassem algumas palavras... poderia ser pela proximidade com Macau? / I didn't know there were used Portuguese words in Japan... could be due to proximity with Macao?

    "Mamá" é o Espanhol de "Mom" and "Papá" é o Espanhol de "Dad", poderia ser? / "Mamá" is Spanish for "Mom" and "Papá" is Spanish for "Dad", could it be?

    Com certeza! Tempo tudo no Brasil o pessoal aportuguesa palavras estrangeiras. Sejam em Inglês, Espanhol, Francês ou qualquer língua. / Indeed! All the time people in Brazil turn into Portuguese foreign words. Whether they are from English, Spanish, French or any language.
    Alguns exemplos: / Some examples:

    * Abajur > do Francês: Abat-jour / Abajur > from French: Abat-jour
    * Basquete > do Inglês: Basket / Basquete > from English: Basket
    * Crachá > do Francês: Crachat / Crachá > from French: Crachat
    * Drinque > do Inglês: Drink / Drinque > from English: Drink
    * Equipe > do Francês: Équipe / Equipe > from French: Équipe
    * Futebol > do Inglês: Football / Futebol > from English: Football
    * Gueixa > do Japonês: Geisha / Gueixa > from Japanese: Geisha
    * Hóquei > do Inglês: Hockey / Hóquei > from English: Hockey
    * Icebergue > do Inglês: Iceberg / Icebergue > from English: Iceberg
    * Jipe > do Inglês: Jeep / Jipe > from English: Jeep
    * Codaque > do Inglês: Kodak / Codaque > from English: Kodak
    * Lasanha > do Italiano: Lasagna / Lasanha > from Italian: Lasagna
    * Maiô > do Francês: Maillot / Maiô > from French: Maillot
    * Náilon > do Inglês: Nylon / Náilon > from English: Nylon
    * Ônibus > do Latim: Omnibus / Ônibus > from Latin: Omnibus
    * Paelha > do Espanhol: Paella / Paelha > from Spanish: Paella
    * Quacre > do Inglês: Quaker / Quacre > from English: Quaker
    * Rali > do Inglês: Rally / Rali > from English: Rally
    * Sanduíche > do Inglês: Sandwich / Sanduíche > from English: Sandwich
    * Time > do Inglês: Team / Time > from English: Team
    * Vodca > do Russo: Vodka / Vodca > from Russian: Vodka
    * Uísque > do Inglês: Whisky / Uísque > from English: Whisky
    * Iogurte > do Inglês: Yoghurt / Iogurte > from English: Yoghurt
    * Zumbi > do Inglês: Zombie / Zumbi > from English: Zombie

    Espero que possa ter ajudado. / Hope this could be of help.

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    Default Re: typical terms of endearment in brazil

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurinha Traducciones View Post

    "Menina" and "Menino" can be used by any adult towards teens... same thing with "Garoto" and "Garota". For younger kids usually "Criança" or "Moleque" are used.
    Attention that this is OK if you want Portuguese from Brazil.... because in Portugal you don't use the words "Moleque" nor "Garota" and a "Garoto" it's coffee with milk in Lisbon...

    Hope this helps you.

    Mary

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