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Thread: Mob, protest, or what?

 
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    Senior Member Veronica's Avatar
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    Arrow Mob, protest, or what?

    Hi everyone!!
    I think I'm going to need a native English over here heheheeh.

    Lately in my country we've been having "manifestaciones", that's when people go out in the streets and march or bang kitchen pans againts our corrupted political leaders (the latter is called "cacerolazo", another argentinian invention after "dulce de leche" and "colectivo").
    Some people stand in the middle of streets, bridges, or routs to stop traffic and don't let anyone cross. This always attracs TV and media attention and lets their cause be known, but it's highly annoying for everyone caught in the traffic jam for hours. This method is called "piquete" and the ones who do it are "piqueteros".

    How do you translate all this???
    Is is "manifestation"? It just doesn't sound right....How about "protest"?
    The "piquete" is just killing me...

    Maybe it's like dishes and cuisine, there's just no translation...after all, if we don't translate gnocchi, why translate piquete?

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    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Protest is ok, and for piqueteros I've seen it as "piqueteros" or "pickets". Have a look at these links:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/2543753.stm
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/2543753.stm
    http://protests-argentine.feed24.com/go/52173576
    http://protests-argentine.feed24.com/go/52120105
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7327476.stm

    You'll find lots of examples in those links!!

    Hope it helps!

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    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica
    How do you translate all this???
    Is is "manifestation"? It just doesn't sound right....How about "protest"?
    The "piquete" is just killing me...

    Maybe it's like dishes and cuisine, there's just no translation...after all, if we don't translate gnocchi, why translate piquete?
    Hola Verónica:

    Puedes decir protest or demonstration, yo conozco más esa última expresión.

    piquete: picket

    piquetero: squad forming part of picket ( al parecer se usa la palabra española)

    Te ayudará esto mucho:

    The word piquetero is a neologism in the Spanish of Argentina. It comes from piquete (in English, "picket"), that is, a standing blockade and/or demonstration of protest in a significant spot.
    Veamos lo que agregan los nativos.
    Last edited by IUS; 04-25-2008 at 07:08 PM.
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


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    My English husband says: "demonstration", "protest"
    and the participants are "demonstrators or "protestors"
    which just confirms what you are all saying.

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    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kellymellars
    and the participants are "demonstrators or "protestors"
    Demonstrators or protesters are "manifestantes". In Argentina a "piquetero" is... a piquetero... not a demontrator (I guess you should be Argentinian to understand )
    The term "picketers" is used by the BBC. I think we should make the difference...

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    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mem286
    Demonstrators or protesters are "manifestantes". In Argentina a "piquetero" is... a piquetero... not a demonstrator (I guess you should be Argentinian to understand )
    The term "picketers" is used by the BBC. I think we should make the difference...
    I think the term "piquete, piquetero" is used in all Spanish speaking countries more or less the same, as it seems.

    Not to confuse, I am all with mem , a demonstrator with a piquetero.

    The picketers (in Spain) are the ones who impose the demonstration on others. So, the people who do not wish to take part in the demonstrations, are "obliged" to do so by the picketers.

    In Spain, the piquetes are often quite uncivilised.
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


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    Exxcentrica, it sounds like you could be refering to "picketing", and picket lines!
    But in this case picket lines are used to stop people from getting into a place. Usually done during a strike, and though meant to be peaceful it could turn violent. What do you think?

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    Hi Verónica!

    I think protest would be the best choice. "Demonstration" could work, but it doesn't convey the scene quite right, and "strike" is more reserved for unions or groups of people that have stopped doing one thing in order to protest. The situation with the farmers could be called a strike since they have stopped production, but for "cacerolazo", protest would be the best. Just a side note, the term "piqueteros" is used as is in English with no translation, mostly referring to Argentina. Hope it helps!

    Sara

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    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kellymellars
    Exxcentrica, it sounds like you could be refering to "picketing", and picket lines!
    But in this case picket lines are used to stop people from getting into a place. Usually done during a strike, and though meant to be peaceful it could turn violent. What do you think?
    Yes, kelly, this is exactly the meaning in Spain. Picket lines, interesting. These people normally are violent.

    I don't know in other countries....

    I think picket lines and picketing could be good choices.
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


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    Senior Member Veronica's Avatar
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    Well, very interesting!! I would have never imagined "demonstration"... I tend to think a demonstration is like a tupperware meeting, or a play.

    Here in Argentina pickets are normally violent too....

    Thanks everyone!

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