+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Opinions Please

 
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,673
    Rep Power
    3019

    Default Opinions Please

    While watching the World Cup matches the British announcer repeatedly referred to team and country in the plural sense.

    Examples: Here come Brazil onto the field; Argentina have played well in this game. The German team have scored again; etc.; as if country and team are plural.

    I've noticed this recently in areas other than just football and it seems to be used, generally, in UK English.

    In my world, a country is a single entity, as is a team.

    What's your view?
    vicente

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    295
    Rep Power
    939

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    It would puzzle me a little to hear someone refer to a team in the plural (i.e. "The German team have scored again")

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,673
    Rep Power
    3019

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaMan View Post
    It would puzzle me a little to hear someone refer to a team in the plural (i.e. "The German team have scored again")
    It struck me as strange too but these announcers are educated people. Honest! It's not my imagination. I've heard this on other occasions and not just in referring to a team.
    What do you think of it in reference to a country?
    vicente

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    422
    Rep Power
    711

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    Maybe they are trying to convey the message that the team or country is united as "one"?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,673
    Rep Power
    3019

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    I'm sure they are amayo but is it grammatically correct? If they want to unify them why not say here come the Brazilians instead of here come Brazil. Why not say the Argentines have played well instead of their team have played well?

    Hasn't anybody else ever noticed this? Am I imagining all this?
    vicente

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    295
    Rep Power
    939

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    Quote Originally Posted by vicente View Post
    I'm sure they are amayo but is it grammatically correct? If they want to unify them why not say here come the Brazilians instead of here come Brazil. Why not say the Argentines have played well instead of their team have played well?

    Hasn't anybody else ever noticed this? Am I imagining all this?
    I don't think it is grammatically correct. I have not paid too much attention to English broadcasts of the games. I actually watch the games in Spanish. I can feel the announcer is actually living the game

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,673
    Rep Power
    3019

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaMan View Post
    I don't think it is grammatically correct. I have not paid too much attention to English broadcasts of the games. I actually watch the games in Spanish. I can feel the announcer is actually living the game

    This is so prevalent that I googled it. Much to my surprise there are a number of responses dealing with this subject and apparently it is acceptable to use a collective noun in the singular or plural, depending on the sense of the sentence. (I just did it myself ..."are a number")

    https://www.google.com/#q=use+of+tea...e+plural+sense

    Note: Even our discussion is among the Google responses!!
    vicente

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    422
    Rep Power
    711

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    Spanish announcers most definitely know how to liven up the game. The best is when a goal is made and they scream "Gooooooolllllllllllllllll..................." for what feels like eternity.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    283
    Rep Power
    243

    Default Re: Opinions Please

    Quote Originally Posted by vicente View Post
    I'm sure they are amayo but is it grammatically correct? If they want to unify them why not say here come the Brazilians instead of here come Brazil. Why not say the Argentines have played well instead of their team have played well?

    Hasn't anybody else ever noticed this? Am I imagining all this?
    Not sure if it's grammatically correct, but for sure does not sound right.

+ Reply to Thread

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •