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Thread: Gringo. ¿Que signífica?

 
  1. #51
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    Default Re: Gringo. ¿Que signífica?

    Gracias y saludos Lauracipolla!

    I asked my wife about "chele" and she says you are probably right and that it comes from the word "leche".

    In Nicaragua they say "pelon" for a bald person and even "peloncito/a" for a baby.

    The word "mamacita" is another good example. It runs the gamut from extremely vulgar (de los chicos en la calle) to very affectionate (a la mama de los hijos).

    Compadre can also fall into this category as it normally means that you are the "godfather of somone's child" and therefore a "co-parent" (compadre) with the biological father. But if said to someone in the calle (alguien desconocido), it can mean, "I slept with your wife"! Usually said as a challenge and to start a fight!

    Such is life in a culture where "double entendre" rules the day!!!!

  2. #52
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    Default Re: Gringo. ¿Que signífica?

    wow! I don't mean to compete with you, but about "double entendre"... in my country we're specialist. We should open a new thread, but I'm afraid it would be full of ****
    jajaja!
    ;-)

  3. #53
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    Default Re: Gringo. ¿Que signífica?

    Quote Originally Posted by JackMcG
    One small point.... Nicaraguans refer to themselves as "nicas" not "nicos" whether they are male or female. As opposed to Costa Rican people who are either "ticas" or "ticos".
    As to the use of the name "gringo" in Nicaragua, it can be friendly or offensive depending on the conversation and the intent of the person using it. It generally refers to people from the USA but many times it includes Canadians and Europeans especially if the are blonde and blue-eyed.
    I, personally have been called gringo by many and various small children who were being playful and affectionate with me at the time. I have also been called gringo by young punks who were looking for trouble or telling me to go home! But my favorite use of the word is when my Nicaraguan wife makes "gallo pinto" for me. I ask her to add some scrambled eggs, tomato and peppers to it to suit my taste and she calls it "gallo pinto gringo". And I love it!

    Also in Nicaragua and in Costa Rica, it is often a term of endearment to call someone after their appearance. For example, if a person is bit fat (chubby as we say in the USA) they might be called "gordito/a". If they are thin they might be called "flaco/a". Or if they are dark skinned, "negrita or morenita". All with much affection and without offense. Me, I have grey hair and they often call me "chele"! As they do many men with grey hair or are light skinned.

    That's what we have been saying all along. What somebody calls you is not important. It is how they say it...their intent. Like "mi amor"; if it is said by someone who loves you it is a term of love or endearment. If it is said by someone who doesn't know you, it means nothing...a simple term like "dear". And gringo is the same way...If you are talking directly to me and say "hey gingo!" and I don't know you, I suspect you are probably insulting me: however, if I know you, then it means nothing. If you describe me to someone else as a gringo, "el es un gringo", that means nothing except that you are telling somebody else what I am or where I am from. And as for Canadians and Europeans being called gringo, I imagine it is because we look alike...at least some of us...and it is hard to tell a European from and American just by looking or hearing them speak unless you know what language they speak.

    JackMcG: At the hotel in San Jose I stay in they serve gallo pinto with scrambled eggs. They have tomatoes on the side but not cooked in with the eggs and no peppers. I like gallo pinto but I always have to ask for salsa picante to liven it up and Costa Ricans do not eat highly spiced (translation HOT!) food and they do not have a decent salsa picante anywhere...not that I have found anyway. I have to settle for a fake tabasco sauce...something called tobasco made by Cinzano...not the real Tabasco Sauce from New Iberia, Louisiana. What they need is some good Mexican salsa picante, verde o roja to give some life to the gallo pinto.
    vicente

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    Default Re: Gringo. ¿Que signífica?

    Quote Originally Posted by vicente
    A good friend and I were discussing que signífiga la palabra "gringo" and its origen. We learned that it had a different meaning to each of us. What does it mean to you?
    I know "gringo" means: green, go! and it is because of the green card. When american citizens crossed the border, officers told them "green, go" or in other words "you can pass, american" But nowadays it is different, I know it because I live in Mexicali, Baja California, besides California, so here is the border and I go to US almost every week.

    I do not if I am right, but it is just my opinion and that I've learned .
    I call it "culture"

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