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Thread: Slang

 
  1. #1
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    Default Slang

    Hey everyone,

    Need to know what this word means-

    Andate

    ...

    im assuming its slang cuz i cant find it in any dictionary !!

    thanks!


  2. #2
    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by crystalclr20
    Need to know what this word means-

    Andate thanks!
    It is the verb "GO" in a command (imperative) form

    Hope it helps


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    Default Re: Slang

    You would have to look up the word, which is a verb, in the infinitive form: andar.
    te is a reflexive pronoun that can be added to the verb.

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    Moderator SandraT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    Exactly and I think this is the way Argentinians say it. Mexicans would say Andele and Argentinians Andate (stress on the second syllable). It means "go" or "leave" depending on the context and on the entonation of the word!
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by SandraT
    Exactly and I think this is the way Argentinians say it. Mexicans would say Andele and Argentinians Andate (stress on the second syllable). It means "go" or "leave" depending on the context and on the entonation of the word!
    I have heard the term andele many times in Mexico. Often it is followed by pues...andele pues...it sorta means "well, lets get going". It is also used as an exclamation similar to "let's get it on!!"! As Sandra says, it's exact meaning depends on the context and emphasis.
    vicente

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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by SandraT
    Exactly and I think this is the way Argentinians say it. Mexicans would say Andele and Argentinians Andate (stress on the second syllable). It means "go" or "leave" depending on the context and on the entonation of the word!

    I'm curious about the comment about pronouncing "andate" with the accent on the second syllable. There is a restaurant in my city named "Andále" and I always thought that the accent on their sign was incorrect, that the accent would be on the first syllable. Is andále correct?

    I thought the word "anda" would have the accent on the penultimate syllable because it ends with a vowel, and usually you would use an accent to preserve the accent on that syllable when adding a reflexive pronoun. For example, cuida/cuídate.

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    Default Re: Slang

    In Mexico the accent is on the first syllable.
    vicente

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    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by mariaklec
    I'm curious about the comment about pronouncing "andate" with the accent on the second syllable. There is a restaurant in my city named "Andále" and I always thought that the accent on their sign was incorrect, that the accent would be on the first syllable. Is andále correct?

    I thought the word "anda" would have the accent on the penultimate syllable because it ends with a vowel, and usually you would use an accent to preserve the accent on that syllable when adding a reflexive pronoun. For example, cuida/cuídate.
    You're right... but in Argentina, for instance we don't say "cuídate" but "cuidate" (with the prosodic accent in the sylable "da"). As SandraT says we, Argentinians say "andate" (meaning go away) but I've never heard the word "Andále" before... do you know where the owners of that restaurante are from?

    Best regards,

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    Default Re: Slang

    Oops, I went to the website to find out where the restaurant owners might be from and it's not Andále, it's Andalé. Still, I'm confused about the accent.

    From the website: "Andalé opened its doors in 1987, started by three friends, Luís, Ignacio and Pedro, all hailing from San José de Gracia in central Mexico."

    Does Andalé have the accent in the right place? In Argentina, do you write "cuidate" without the accent over the i, since you don't accent the word on that syllable?

  10. #10
    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by mariaklec
    Does Andalé have the accent in the right place? In Argentina, do you write "cuidate" without the accent over the i, since you don't accent the word on that syllable?
    Yes mariaklec, without the accent... cuidate (da is the strong sylable). As for "andalé" it sounds Mexican, but I'm not sure. Maybe it's a regional accent...

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