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  1. #11
    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    Let's see... Argentinians use "Vos" instead of "tú" for the second person singular, so the conjugation of the verbs change.

    Imperative of non-reflexive verbs...
    Ex. comer

    singular
    tú - come
    vos - comé (used in Argentina)
    usted - coma (also used in Argentina - more formal)

    plural
    nosotros - comamos
    vosotros - comed (not used in Argentina)
    ustedes - coman (used in Argentina)

    Reflexives....
    Ex.cuidarse

    singular
    tú - cuídate
    vos - cuidate (no accent here) (used in Argentina)
    usted - cuídese (also used in Argentina - more formal)

    plural
    nosotros - cuidémosnos
    vosotros - cuidaos (not used in Argentina)
    ustedes - cuídense

    you eat - tú come las manzanas
    you eat - vos comé las manzanas (used in Argentina)
    you eat - usted coma las manzanas

    In this case, Usted is the formal form of the second person singular, meanwhile tú (vos in Argentina) is the familiar or more informal form we use to address to people you already know or young people.
    You can address younger people with "tú" ("vos" in Argenitna) or some adult who is your age.
    Usted is used when you address to your teachers or people who are older than you. Also when you first meet an adult. Conjugations for usted are the same as conjugations for él

    lets eat - nosotros comamos las manzanas
    you (plural) eat - vosotros comed las manzanas (not used in Argentina)
    you (plural) eat - ustedes coman las manzanas (used in Argentina)

    Hope it helps and I didn't confuse you more Just let me know please.
    Last edited by mem286; 03-29-2009 at 07:44 PM.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Slang

    Very enlightening! Thanks Mem286! I didn't know that about the "vos" forms. Still not clear on Andalé, though.

    Thanks for taking the time to type all that out. I thought it was very interesting.

  3. #13
    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by mariaklec
    Very enlightening! Thanks Mem286! I didn't know that about the "vos" forms. Still not clear on Andalé, though.

    Thanks for taking the time to type all that out. I thought it was very interesting.
    Great! I'm glad I could help... . As for "andalé" I hope someone from Mexico gets in this thread, beacuse I think the term is theirs. I googled the term and there are restaurants, cafés and even fonts with that name: andalé with the accent in the é!!!

    I also found this:

    1- ándale: from Spanish verb andar. Romance variant of Romance ambulare - walk around plus Spanish dative pronoum "le", a command "to walk", "go on". Bently 1932. An exclamation meaning "hurry up" or "get going". This term is common in the Southwest and was often used when driving cattle. Bently also adds that a mother sending her child or servant on an errand might be expected to conclude her instructions with "Now, ándale" or "Now ándale pronto (quick)". Alternative form: odale, (problably from órale, another similar Mexican expression).

    From: Cowboy Talk, An essential reference for Spanish-derived terms related to ranching and cowboying



    2- The form andale `get going' is registered by the late nineteenth century in Ramos y Duarte's Diccionario de mejicanismos (1895: 43) and in Modismos, locuciones y terminos mexicanos (1992 [1892]: 27) by Jose Sanchez Samoano, a Peninsular (Asturian) visitor to Mexico, who wrote, "Para animar alli a alguno ... para decidirle pronto le dicen: andele, amigo" [To animate someone over there ... to get him going quickly, they say: andele my friend]. (1) In his American-Spanish Syntax, Kany (1951: 127-129) includes a section on what he calls "neuter le," said to be "exceedingly common" in Mexico and equivalent to the expression no mas (ande no mas = andele, pase no mas = pasele), though it is not clear what precisely that meaning is.
    It is true that this le seems omnipresent in Mexican Spanish, especially in vernacular varieties, and that it is most easily recognizable in imperatives, where it occurs enclitically. (2) A typical example is (2), from Carlos Santana's Supernatural album: right as the master guitarist begins to play his guitar, the lead vocalist says,
    (2) Echale mi Carlitos `Go on, play (do it)' (Mana-Santana, "Corazon espinado", Supernatural [09] 2:01, Arista Records 1999)

    From: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...9?tag=untagged
    Last edited by mem286; 03-29-2009 at 10:02 PM.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Slang

    Es la primera vez que lo veo escrito de esa manera, pero sí, con acento en la última silaba hacemos énfasis en el significado de ¡Apúrate! Es común escucharlo en la Ciudad de México y partes del Sur de México. Pero en Querétaro o Guanajuato no he escuchado esa entonación.

    A veces también se usó "ándale" para significar que "tienes razón" especialmente en conversaciones muy informales.

    Y no olvidar al ratón Speedy González que decía:

    ¡Ándale, ándale, arriba, arriba, yijahaaa!

    O también ¡Andas! para significar ¡Exacto! ¡le atinaste! ¡Por ahí vas! Se utilizo en los 80's y 90's. Hoy en día ya no la he escuchado de esa manera, no sé si se siga aplicando.

    Bueno, esto de los modismos siempre cambia según las generaciones y las modas... creo que estoy envejeciendo

    Saludos

  5. #15
    Senior Member mem286's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by speculumcm
    Y no olvidar al ratón Speedy González que decía:

    ¡Ándale, ándale, arriba, arriba, yijahaaa!
    jajajaja es verdad!! no me acordaba

    Thanks for the info speculumcm!! specially coming from a Mexican!!!

    Saludos!

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by mem286
    jajajaja es verdad!! no me acordaba

    Thanks for the info speculumcm!! specially coming from a Mexican!!!

    Saludos!
    You're welcome mem. Always willing to participate, specially if I can make someone smile with her/his heart.

    Kindest Regards

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Slang

    I think we are missing a point here.

    "Andate" (stress on the "da") is the imperative of the "vos" form.
    "Andale" (stress on the "an") is the imperative of the "tú" form, with "le" a regionalism I don't recall hearing outside Mexico.
    (Sorry, but I can't type a capital "A" that is stressed.)

    Sentate aquí = (Vos) Sit here.
    Siéntate aquí = (Tú) Sit here.
    Siéntese aquí = (Usted) Sit here.
    Siéntense aquí = (Ustedes) Sit here.

    Decime la verdad. = (Vos) Tell me the truth.
    Dime la verdad.= (Tú) Tell me the truth.
    Dígame la verdad. = (Usted) Tell me the truth.
    Díganme la verdad. = (Ustedes) Tell me the truth.

    We associate "vos" with Argentina, but it's heard in many Latin American countries. It certainly appears to be dying out in Costa Rica. Back in the 1970s, the joke was that only tourists and another group I won't identify for fear of offending others said "tú" rather than "vos", but today "tú" in the Central Valley clearly is more widely used than "vos".


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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by mariaklec
    Oops, I went to the website to find out where the restaurant owners might be from and it's not Andále, it's Andalé. Still, I'm confused about the accent.

    From the website: "Andalé opened its doors in 1987, started by three friends, Luís, Ignacio and Pedro, all hailing from San José de Gracia in central Mexico."

    Does Andalé have the accent in the right place? In Argentina, do you write "cuidate" without the accent over the i, since you don't accent the word on that syllable?

    Mem may be right about it being regional. I remember a song I heard once at a festival in Oaxaca that went:

    Y andalé, andalé, andalé
    Amuzgueña de mi vida
    Amuzgueña de mi amor

    and later in the song:

    Y ándale, ándale, ándale
    Amuzgueña de mi vida
    Amuzgueña de mi amor

    The meaning was clarly the same in both stanzas just an artistic play on the word. I suspect the restaurant may have been doing the same. Here is a website I found that has the song and many others by a locally famous composer.

    http://www.cacahuatepec.gob.mx/wb2/m...i_biografiasfg

    Joel
    "El verdadero objectivo de la vida no es el destino final, si no disfrutar el camino."

  9. #19
    Senior Member mvictoria's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slang

    I don't think that "andate" (Argentina ) and "ándale" (México) have the same meaning

    andate= go away
    ándale = go ahead

    Therefore, the Mexican equivalent for the Argentine "andate" would be "vete"
    and the Argentine equivalent for the Mexican "ándale" would be "dale".

    Thank you!

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by speculumcm
    Es la primera vez que lo veo escrito de esa manera, pero sí, con acento en la última silaba hacemos énfasis en el significado de ¡Apúrate! Es común escucharlo en la Ciudad de México y partes del Sur de México. Pero en Querétaro o Guanajuato no he escuchado esa entonación.

    A veces también se usó "ándale" para significar que "tienes razón" especialmente en conversaciones muy informales.

    Bueno, esto de los modismos siempre cambia según las generaciones y las modas... creo que estoy envejeciendo

    Saludos

    This is the best description of ándale in Mexico that I have read. Though it literally means to walk, to go, to travel, to be (anda triste), to ride (anda a caballo), to function (el auto anda bien) it is often used in slang to mean "you are right", "hurry", etc., and the accent is usually on the first syllable but can be on the last syllable for extra emphasis...as in andaleeé..wow, you were right!! or hurry uuppp!! just as in other words that we put emphasis on a different syllable for effect. An example in English would be...incrédible, which normally has the accent on the 2nd syllable...but for emphasis we often say INcredible.

    Thats my take on ándale Saludos
    vicente

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