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Thread: I'm stuck with these

 
  1. #1
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    Default I'm stuck with these

    "El que calla no siempre otorga" - The one who is silent is not always rewarded? The word "otorga" is confusing me.

    and another one

    "Ah, entonces falta", as a reply to the line "This is the beginning of the end".


    I'll really appreciate your help guys.

  2. #2
    Contributing User matiasc's Avatar
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    Default Re: I'm stuck with these

    He Silverred!

    The first phrase by the "otorga" is not meant as a reward but as giving reason to the other. I don't know how to put it in english.. But with that meaning you might know how to.

    The second one is more like a joke..

    - This is the beginning of the end..
    - Oh, so there's al lot of time ahead..

    That will be like a raw translation.. Feel free to wait for a translator comment

    See you around!
    Last edited by matiasc; 08-25-2016 at 05:32 PM.
    /MatiasC
    C:/DOS
    C:/DOS/RUN
    RUN/DOS/RUN



  3. #3
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    Default Re: I'm stuck with these

    Hello Silverred,

    The first sentence is a twist to the very common saying "el que calla otorga". It means that when you are accused and you don't say a word, you are confirming your guilt or responsibility. This last part corresponds to the meaning of "otorgar·.
    In this case, an exception to the saying is added with the "not always".

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    Default Re: I'm stuck with these

    Then "El que calla no siempre otorga" means that remaining silent doesn't always mean one is guilty??

    That goes along with the US Supreme Court's ruling in Miranda vs Arizona in 1966 that a person has the RIGHT to remain silent and must be advised of that right by police if interrogated in custody, i.e., not free to walk away; hence the so-named Miranda Warning that all police must give to a person suspected of a crime, before questioning. It goes something like this: "You have the right to remain silent and anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law".

    So, given the possible consequences, even an innocent person would be wise to keep quiet.
    vicente

  5. #5
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    Default Re: I'm stuck with these

    Exactly, Vicente, but that is not how the saying usually goes. Too bad that our "sabidurķa popular" is stronger that the reference of the US laws

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