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Thread: Help to translate: "milanesa"

 
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    Default Help to translate: "milanesa"

    No estoy segura de la traducción del plato argentino "milanesa". Alguna profesora me sugirió dos opciones: "milanese veal" o "breaded steak/meat", pero no sé si son válidas.

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    Senior Member Veronica's Avatar
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    Hello!
    I've never heard "milanese veal" but it sounds kind of cool!
    I'd go with the breaded steak.

    I bet foreigners who visit Argentina call it milanesa too, just like "empanadas" there's no accurate translation.

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    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    How about "veal parmesan"?


    Truly, my dear young friends, you are a chosen generation. I hope you will never forget it.
    Gordon B. Hinckley

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    Thumbs up

    To Veronica: Once, while watching a cook from the States on tv, the woman called the empanadas "turnovers", but I never heard or saw it again. I agree with you, probably the name "milanesas" would remain the same with foreigners. Kisses.

    To Hebe: I will check the option you suggested, the only difference I see is that one comes from Milan and the other from Parma. Thanks! Kisses

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    I agree with Hebe .. veal parmesan is a good choice

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    Default milanesa and empanadas

    "veal milanesa" is of course only valid if the meat is in fact veal. "breaded flank steak" is a fair transation of milanesa, though I agree with Veronica that there's hardly a need for a translation. Who translates the word "pizza"? One of the most stupid-sounding things foreigners in Buenos Aires try to do is translate the word "empanada". An "empanada" is an empanada.

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    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmeromero
    "there's hardly a need for a translation. Who translates the word "pizza"? One of the most stupid-sounding things foreigners in Buenos Aires try to do is translate the word "empanada". An "empanada" is an empanada.
    This is not always true meromero. Although American English has adopted words such as burritos”, “tortilla, I am not sure that the rest of the English speaking world would associate any meaning to words such as “empanada”.; just as the words "English muffins" and “beagles” have no meaning for most Spanish speakers. I believe that in such cases a translation is necessary, specially in cases where (unlike USA and Mexico) the lack of sharing borders do not leave much room culture exchange


    Truly, my dear young friends, you are a chosen generation. I hope you will never forget it.
    Gordon B. Hinckley

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    You have a point there Hebe

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    Question dominican spanish?

    i dont know if its diff from reg. spanish but when i translate in spanish from a diff. site(bcuz im asian) my boyfriend doesnt comprehend it well a little..he says its a diff spanish kinda. im trying to learn...lol like how do you say simple things like ''i love you" or ''im going to the store'' or ''i know you do'' .

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    milanesa is usually made with churrasco (steak), not veal. For the record, parmesan dishes always have tomato sauce and cheese. milanesa is not served like that. I agree with Veronica on breaded steak and I hope you did not use parmesan.

    On the side topic - turnovers is very often used in the United States but usually with reference to a fruit filled empanada (i.e., apple turnover).

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