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Thread: certeza jurídica

 
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    Default certeza jurídica

    I was reading an article about Obama and the Spanish speakers in the States and I found that the journalist translated, the “YES WE CAN” campaign slogan as “si se puede” (if we can), instead of “¡Sí, se puede!” (Yes we can!). What a difference an accent mark can make!

    http://translation-blog.trustedtrans...008-08-12.html

    Anyway I think that "Sí, se puede" is not the best translation for "Yes, we can". I like "¡Sí, podemos!" more. What do you think?

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    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
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    Default Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    Yo pienso que "sí, se puede" es la mejor opción.
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


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    Moderator SandraT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    la verdad es que es una buena pregunta...si tomas el contexto de que es una campaña presidencial de un partido político pues entonces lo traduciría como ¡Sí, podemos! refiriéndose a que el partido puede hacer esto, lograr aquello...o sea, nosotros podemos...
    Pero si se refiere a una pregunta más abierta...a abogar por los cambios que es algo que ha caracterizado la campaña de Obama pues entonces ¡Sí, se puede! (lograr los cambios, cambiar esto,...etc).
    Por lo que sacando la frase de contexto y sólo pensando en una frase pegajosa para una campaña lo dejaría con la segunda variante: ¡Sí, se puede!
    ¿Qué crees?
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    Default Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    Quote Originally Posted by SandraT
    la verdad es que es una buena pregunta...si tomas el contexto de que es una campaña presidencial de un partido político pues entonces lo traduciría como ¡Sí, podemos! refiriéndose a que el partido puede hacer esto, lograr aquello...o sea, nosotros podemos...
    Pero si se refiere a una pregunta más abierta...a abogar por los cambios que es algo que ha caracterizado la campaña de Obama pues entonces ¡Sí, se puede! (lograr los cambios, cambiar esto,...etc).
    Por lo que sacando la frase de contexto y sólo pensando en una frase pegajosa para una campaña lo dejaría con la segunda variante: ¡Sí, se puede!
    ¿Qué crees?
    Hola!

    Doesn't "se puede" mean "it can be done"? I think the Obama phrase which is about the people, the nation, not just the party ( "Obama's uplifting message of hope, unity and change,...") being able to make a change, if written out in a sentence would read something like "Yes, we can do it" so I think I agree with Gustavo. Besides I have seen this slogan in Central America in reference to a major change in a country. So I'm going with ¡Si, Podemos!

    The reason I would go with "nosotros" is that politicians like to use slogans that imply unity and include all the people and not just people of one party and I think that is probably the intent of the Obama slogan.

    However, I am not into politics so either phrase is wasted on me.
    vicente

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    Default Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    Hola Vicente,

    I have always felt the use of the impersonal "se" is a way of unifying a message. In the U. S. the very common "se habla español" brings more than the message Spanish is spoken here, it says we want your business and will work with you in your native language.

    I have to agree with Sandra and say Sí, se puede is a good unifying phrase expressing the same sentiment as "Yes, we can".

    Regarding the original mistranslation (or perhaps misspelling) unfortunately this is all too common here in the U. S. In this case, however it's almost comical since "if we can" may be a more true to life statement for a political campaign.

    Joel
    "El verdadero objectivo de la vida no es el destino final, si no disfrutar el camino."

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    Default Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    Creo que el "Si se puede" es tambien un slogan del PAN en México.

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    Default Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    "Sí se puede", is a phrase that has become very popular in Mexico over the last 10 years in sports events where Mexican teams are involved (as I remember it began in the France World Cup in 1998). It later became a rallying chant for almost all sports (and even politics): soccer, olympics, etc. I think it stems from the historic frustration Mexican fans have experienced over the years, and the strong belief that this time around results will finally be different, and I believe that is why the translator used it. I would translate "Sí se puede" as "It can be done". Therefore, I must agree with Sandra T. that "Sí podemos" is a better translation for "Yes we can".

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    Default Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    My two cents. The key is that "se puede" is not exactly the same as "it can be done”. You just can't say "se puede" in English, you need a main verb (it can be xxxx) that's not necessary in Spanish and that's the difference and what makes the Spanish passive so appropriate.

    It can be done is "Puede hacerse" and it seems to lack the enthusiasm that "Sí se puede" delivers. I understand your objections since there's normally very little enthusiasm in English passive sentences. Besides, there’s a difference between “Sí, se puede” (just stating it is possible), and “Sí se puede” (a more enthusiastic response as opposed to the negative sentence “No se puede”). On the other hand, “se puede” is often used just meaning “it is actually possible”, that's why several native Spanish speakers seem to agree it is a good translation, because it’s understood as an enthusiastic “of course it is possible”.

    "Podemos" was the motto the Spanish National Team used for the latest European Football Championship (and we all know who won, don't we? ). Nothing wrong with that! It really worked for us but since podemos is transitive and you're not including the direct object it's like you know exactly what you're referring to (in Spain's case not messing it at the quarterfinals as they used to do) but “Se puede” seems to leave room for a broader message.

    Podemos: It would be mainly aimed to those who support Obama, those who feel part of the change, somehow active. Se puede: it’s a message for everyone, the change is possible, even if you’re not working for it, or just don't believe it can be done, you’ll see it’s possible.

    In short. Sí se puede is not the most literal alternative but it really delivers a more powerful message that includes everyone in the country.
    Last edited by Goodnightmoon; 08-15-2008 at 04:04 PM.

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    Smile Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rsada
    "Sí se puede", is a phrase that has become very popular in Mexico over the last 10 years in sports events where Mexican teams are involved (as I remember it began in the France World Cup in 1998). It later became a rallying chant for almost all sports (and even politics): soccer, olympics, etc. I think it stems from the historic frustration Mexican fans have experienced over the years, and the strong belief that this time around results will finally be different, and I believe that is why the translator used it. I would translate "Sí se puede" as "It can be done". Therefore, I must agree with Sandra T. that "Sí podemos" is a better translation for "Yes we can".
    Very interresting Rsada, didn´t know that.

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    Arrow Re: Yes We Can Mistranslation

    Quote Originally Posted by Goodnightmoon
    My two cents. The key is that "se puede" is not exactly the same as "it can be done”. You just can't say "se puede" in English, you need a main verb (it can be xxxx) that's not necessary in Spanish and that's the difference and what makes the Spanish passive so appropriate.

    It can be done is "Puede hacerse" and it seems to lack the enthusiasm that "Sí se puede" delivers. I understand your objections since there's normally very little enthusiasm in English passive sentences. Besides, there’s a difference between “Sí, se puede” (just stating it is possible), and “Sí se puede” (a more enthusiastic response as opposed to the negative sentence “No se puede”). On the other hand, “se puede” is often used just meaning “it is actually possible”, that's why several native Spanish speakers seem to agree it is a good translation, because it’s understood as an enthusiastic “of course it is possible”.

    "Podemos" was the motto the Spanish National Team used for the latest European Football Championship (and we all know who won, don't we? ). Nothing wrong with that! It really worked for us but since podemos is transitive and you're not including the direct object it's like you know exactly what you're referring to (in Spain's case not messing it at the quarterfinals as they used to do) but “Se puede” seems to leave room for a broader message.

    Podemos: It would be mainly aimed to those who support Obama, those who feel part of the change, somehow active. Se puede: it’s a message for everyone, the change is possible, even if you’re not working for it, or just don't believe it can be done, you’ll see it’s possible.

    In short. Sí se puede is not the most literal alternative but it really delivers a more powerful message that includes everyone in the country.
    Also very interesting Goodnight, more than 2 cents, may be a dolar.


    I forget that "podemos" was the slogan of the Spain National Football team at the Euro Cup. I am also remembering now, that an argentinean politician that lost the presidential election some years ago used the sloga "Se Puede".

    Anyway, the reason why I right this post at English to Spanish Marketing translation was because I understand that the final decision about this translation should e related to political markegint decisions. But I am surte that the correc translation was not "Si se puede" withouth accent.


    Also what is very intersting is that the correct marketing translation for the hispanich market in the US it is very complex to find because the difference heritage of the Spanish speakers in the States.

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