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Thread: unilaterlamente y rescindir

 
  1. #11
    Senior Member Guadalupe's Avatar
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    Hi there! Yes, Vicente! I think I got confused, too!

    In relation to the phrase "dar por terminado" I would analyze the context. Sometimes, lawyers use it as a broad term. They may use it generally or with a restricted meaning, as Exx suggested. In orden for you to understand, Vicente, I would translate it as "be deemed terminated". Here is an example which I found useful:
    En ningún caso podrá considerarse prorrogado o reconducido este Contrato, en forma expresa o tácita, ni aun cuando una vez finalizado el período de vigencia establecido precedentemente las Partes continuaren ejecutándolo, a excepción que las Partes lo convengan por escrito y de común acuerdo. >> In no case shall this Agreement be renewed or extended, whether expressly or impliedly, nor even when the Parties continued performing the obligations hereunder after the expiration of the lease term herein set forth; unless the Parties mutually agree to do so in writing.

    Edited part: Let me explain the idea in this section. In this case, this provision states that the agreement will not be deemed renewed or extended. Therefore, it is deemed that it is terminated ("se da por terminado") (upon expiration of the lease term), unless the parties decide to execute a written document as evidence of their intention to continue with the lease. The general idea in the clause is that the agreement shall be deemed terminated. Otherwise, if the parties do not want their agreement to expire, they will have to draft some written document in order to extend/renew the agreement.

    Hope it clarifies!
    Last edited by Guadalupe; 08-09-2008 at 06:51 PM.
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    quote=Guadalupe]Hi there! Yes, Vicente! I think I got confused, too!

    In relation to the phrase "dar por terminado" I would analyze the context. Sometimes, lawyers use it as a broad term. They may use it generally or with a restricted meaning, as Exx suggested. In orden for you to understand, Vicente, I would translate it as "be deemed terminated". Here is an example which I found useful:
    En ningún caso podrá considerarse prorrogado o reconducido [darse por finalizado] este Contrato, en forma expresa o tácita, ni aun cuando una vez finalizado el período de vigencia establecido precedentemente las Partes continuaren ejecutándolo, a excepción que las Partes lo convengan por escrito y de común acuerdo. >>

    In no case shall this Agreement be renewed or extended, whether expressly or impliedly, nor even when the Parties continued performing the obligations hereunder after the expiration of the lease term herein set forth; unless the Parties mutually agree to do so in writing.

    Hope it clarifies!
    [/QUOTE]


    Ay ay ay! Now I'm even more confused Guadalupe Sorry

    Is dar por finalizado the same as dar por terminado?...and if they mean "be deemed terminated" do they also mean "extended"? Obviously renewed and extended are not synonymous with terminated so where I am I missing the point?
    vicente

  3. #13
    Senior Member Guadalupe's Avatar
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    Ay ay ay! Now I'm even more confused Guadalupe Sorry

    Is dar por finalizado the same as dar por terminado?...and if they mean "be deemed terminated" do they also mean "extended"? Obviously renewed and extended are not synonymous with terminated so where I am I missing the point?[/quote]

    Ooops! I was about to edit my post because I made a mistake/I think I should clarify it better...

    Have a look at the edited part on the post above.

    Summary: Dar por finalizado = dar por terminado (but I'm more familiar with the first phrase) /opposite to: renew or extend.
    Last edited by Guadalupe; 08-09-2008 at 07:01 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guadalupe
    Ay ay ay! Now I'm even more confused Guadalupe Sorry

    Is dar por finalizado the same as dar por terminado?...and if they mean "be deemed terminated" do they also mean "extended"? Obviously renewed and extended are not synonymous with terminated so where I am I missing the point?
    Ooops! I was about to edit my post because I made a mistake/I think I should clarify it better...

    Have a look at the edited part on the post above.

    Summary: Dar por finalizado = dar por terminado (but I'm more familiar with the first phrase) /opposite to: renew or extend.
    [/QUOTE]


    OK...Now I've got it Guadalupe! Thanks
    vicente

  5. #15
    Senior Member Guadalupe's Avatar
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    OK...Now I've got it Guadalupe! Thanks[/quote]

    Great, Vicente! Thank you for your patience
    Guadalupe

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