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    Default Licenciado

    I was wondering how to translate "Licenciado" in English. I realize that the titles are different depending on the country, but would "Esquire" be the equivalent? For example, in a legal deposition, is it more appropriate to put Lcdo. (name) and perhaps include a footnote that explains the difference, or (name), Esq.? Thanks for the help!

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    Sarab, there is already a long thread about the tittles in English/Spanish and the differences in countries. I can't remember where it is exactly but there is good information on that.
    Anyway, I can tell you that Licenciado is translated depending on the "last name", that is, Licenciado en Educacion...Bachelor of Arts in Education...Licenciado en Literatura.... B.A. in Literature and so on. I reallt suggest you look for the thread, it even has a good link to other forum where the same topic was discused. (I think it's from last week)

    I just realized you started that very same thread... there is one more that can help...

    http://www.english-spanish-translato...searchid=38888
    Last edited by SandraT; 08-14-2007 at 02:56 PM.
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    Thanks for the response Sandra! But I am looking for something more particular to the legal field, specifically about how you write out the title of a lawyer, for example: Lcdo. John Smith, would that be John Smith, Esq. or would it remain the same but with a footnote explaining licenciado. I think Lcdo. has also been translated as attorney, but I am not sure how it works for a lawyer's title.

    I was not able to open the link you sent, but I will keep on searching!

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    Default Lic./Dr.

    Hi, dear!!

    To address attorneys you will find Licenciado/Doctor Pedro Gómez.

    According to the different countries they will be addressed as Licenciado (Lic.) or Doctor (Dr.).

    In English you will see that the name appears directly (Pedro Gómez) or you will find "Esq." after their name, like Pedro Gómez, Esq.

    Cheers!!


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    thanks reminder, so when i see lcdo. in spanish it is ok to put esq. after the name, or would a footnote with the explication be best? i also have another question for you. do you ever see Att. after the lawyer's name instead of Esq.?

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