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Thread: Certified vs Notarized vs Legalized - EXPLAINED!

 
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    Senior Member mvictoria's Avatar
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    Default Certified vs Notarized vs Legalized - EXPLAINED!

    Recently, I found myself speaking about "certified" translations when I'm actually thinking about "Legalized" ones.
    I thought I'd share my findings with you all.
    Some basic distinctions to start with:


    • certified translation: it has been performed by a professional qualified translator, and accurately reflects the original. Each page must be stamped & signed by the translation provider. Some translation companies also provide a Certifying Letter - look after this - it's the translation's legal provenance and may be asked for.
    • Notarized translation may be needed where more serious legal matters hinge on accurate translation, such as evidence in a civil or criminal case. To notarize a translation the translator must personally attend a Public Notary's offices, where they will swear before the Notary that they are a professionally qualified translator and that the translation is to the best of their knowledge accurate. The Notary will stamp and authorize the translation. You will need to ask for a duplicate, as a replacement will have to be re-notarized and therefore the same cost will be involved. Notarized documents incur additional legal costs and are often charged per document.
    • Legalised translation may be required for court or civil cases outside the UK. Bureaucracy can extend significantly lead times for legalized translation, so be prepared to allow enough time. Costs vary depending on the country it is for, but we try to minimize these for you. The most common of these processes is apostilling under the Hague Convention.

    By the way, Anybody knows what an actual apostille is??

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    Default Re: Certified vs Notarized vs Legalized - EXPLAINED!

    Hey MVictoria, I actually used those words as interchangeble synonims. Thanks so much for clarifying the difference between them.

    About your question: an apostille is another sort of authentication required for the international acceptance of some notarized documents.

    J.

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    Default Re: Certified vs Notarized vs Legalized - EXPLAINED!

    Quote Originally Posted by mvictoria View Post
    Recently, I found myself speaking about "certified" translations when I'm actually thinking about "Legalized" ones.
    I thought I'd share my findings with you all.
    Some basic distinctions to start with:


    • certified translation: it has been performed by a professional qualified translator, and accurately reflects the original. Each page must be stamped & signed by the translation provider. Some translation companies also provide a Certifying Letter - look after this - it's the translation's legal provenance and may be asked for.
    • Notarized translation may be needed where more serious legal matters hinge on accurate translation, such as evidence in a civil or criminal case. To notarize a translation the translator must personally attend a Public Notary's offices, where they will swear before the Notary that they are a professionally qualified translator and that the translation is to the best of their knowledge accurate. The Notary will stamp and authorize the translation. You will need to ask for a duplicate, as a replacement will have to be re-notarized and therefore the same cost will be involved. Notarized documents incur additional legal costs and are often charged per document.
    • Legalised translation may be required for court or civil cases outside the UK. Bureaucracy can extend significantly lead times for legalized translation, so be prepared to allow enough time. Costs vary depending on the country it is for, but we try to minimize these for you. The most common of these processes is apostilling under the Hague Convention.

    By the way, Anybody knows what an actual apostille is??
    Are these definition valid only for the UK? or Europe?

    I am not sure these differences exist in the US.

    For example, for immigration purposes anyone can translate a document as long as the translator attests under penalty of perjury that he or she is fluent in both languages and that the translation is accurate.

    Maybe someone can shed more light about these definitions in the US.

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    Registered User johnlena112's Avatar
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    Default Re: Certified vs Notarized vs Legalized - EXPLAINED!

    A notary public (or notary or public notary) in the common law world is a public officer constituted by law to serve the public in non-contentious matters usually concerned with estates, deeds, powers-of-attorney, and foreign and international business.

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