+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Any MMA fan like me?

 
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Villa Constitución, Santa Fe, Argentina
    Age
    36
    Posts
    15
    Rep Power
    108

    Default Any MMA fan like me?

    Any MMA fan like me? For those who don't know, MMA stands for Mixed Martial Arts.

  2. #2
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,403
    Rep Power
    1157

    Default What is it about?

    What do you do in MMA? which disciplines do you mix?

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Villa Constitución, Santa Fe, Argentina
    Age
    36
    Posts
    15
    Rep Power
    108

    Default MMA for AnaLaura

    Quote Originally Posted by analaura
    What do you do in MMA? which disciplines do you mix?
    Here you have a quick glimpse of what MMA is about, take a look at it, it's pretty illustrative: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed_martial_arts

    By the way, if you wanted to know if I'm a practitioner, the answer is yes. I practice Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Vale Tudo since 2003. That's why (as a Translator) MMA is one of my fields of expertise.

    Saludos AnaLaura!

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,403
    Rep Power
    1157

    Default Thank you!

    I´ve been having a quick look. I¨m trying to stat with something...
    I´m a sports person, but I´ve never done anything about martial arts... I´m more a fun of all risky and adventure sports - climbing, rappeling, parachuting, etc-
    But I´m thinking of starting some kind of martial arts...

    thanks!

  5. #5
    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    1,241
    Rep Power
    1817

    Default

    I did Karate once...only yellow belt, jeje, well anyway, no fooling around with me.

    I dive.
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


  6. #6
    Senior Member Veronica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    806
    Rep Power
    382

    Default

    I train Kung fu, traditional. The "boxing-fighting-competition" part of kung fu is San Da, it's pretty good if you like those kind of mmaa and trianing.

    I didn't know Jiu Jitsu had a brazilian branch. How is it different from the Japanese one?

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Villa Constitución, Santa Fe, Argentina
    Age
    36
    Posts
    15
    Rep Power
    108

    Default Good question Vero!

    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica
    I train Kung fu, traditional. The "boxing-fighting-competition" part of kung fu is San Da, it's pretty good if you like those kind of mmaa and trianing.

    I didn't know Jiu Jitsu had a brazilian branch. How is it different from the Japanese one?
    I'm really happy to see that the topic I proposed has arisen so much interest!
    Well, for those of you who want to know more about this fascinating Martial Art, here I give some more info. Hope you enjoy it!

    What is Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu?

    Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is an advanced form of the Japanese martial art of the same name. It has been modified by the famous Gracie Family of Brazil to become "arguably the most effective martial art in the world." With the arrival of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu on the martial arts scene, it has forever changed the way fighters train. From now on, no true martial artist, regardless of style, will ever neglect to include Brazilian ground-fighting techniques in his training schedule. Without learning the proper ways to defend and execute techniques from the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu arsenal it is difficult to survive against a good Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Fighter. The Gracie family has proven the merit of this art by entering numerous "no-holds-barred" fights and remaining undefeated for over 70 years.

    Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is predominantly a ground-fighting art. The Gracie fighter's objective is to avoid punches and kicks while attempting to clinch his opponent. Once in the clinch, the opponent's strikes are rendered ineffective. The Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu fighter will then proceed to take the fight to the ground where his opponent's strikes will not have any power behind them. Taken out of his game, the striker is helpless, without the ability to use his stand-up skills. With the fact that 95% of all fights go to the ground, an experienced and well trained Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Fighter will eventually take any type of fighter to the ground.

    Bruce Lee once said that in a fight between a boxer and a wrestler, the wrestler will always win. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is the most advanced form of wrestling in the world, and the most efficient way of beating a good Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu stylist is by being a better Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu stylist.

    The world famous Gracie family stands as a shining example of the proven methods they teach, reigning undefeated in the arena of "no-holds-barred" combat. The form of Jiu-Jitsu they created is a Martial Art that is designed to adapt to any type of Fighting Style or Martial Art, making it reality based. This is a tested and proven style, art, and science.
    It is important to note that not 1 form of fighting style or martial art can defeat every other style completely every time. This is because it can depend on many factors such as: strength, size, skill or technique level, the use of weapons, multiple fighters, sport rules, fighting objectives (to control, tap out, hurt badly, or kill an opponent) etc.

    On a 1 on 1 open handed (no weapons) fight, it has tamed styles such as Kung Fu, Karate, Judo, Boxing, Kickboxing, Shootfighting, Wrestling, Sambo, Vale Tudo, Pancrase, Luta Livre, Pitfighting, Jeet Kune Do, Taekwondo, some forms of Ninjutsu, and even it's parent style of Japanese Jiu-Jitsu.
    It has last notably been proven by Royce Gracie's undefeated record in the "Ultimate Fighting Championship" , (a popular sport of no holds bar competition between any fighting style, as seen on the live Pay Per View event).


    The defense techniques are all based on leverage, making it possible for the fighter to beat stronger and heavier opponents, bringing a sense that no one can beat you. Jiu-Jitsu is not based on strength; it uses the opponents strength and force against themselves. The key is balance (known as "base") and leverage. Typical positions include the "guard", the "mount", and the "side-mount", from which a host of attacks can be made, such as chokes, arm-bars, and joint-locks. 95% of all fights end up grappling on the ground.

    There is really no underlying principle of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu® other than to use what is most effective in any given situation.There is a strong emphasis on ground grappling but this is strictly reality based.Gracie Jiu-Jitsu® is a complete martial art,with strikes,turns,throws,joint locks,twists,and limb breaking holds.They emphasize for each student what they simply refer to as the "self defense program",which consists of simple and effective escapes and counters from grabs,bearhugs and so on,progressing into defenses against weapons,knife and gun disarms etc.After this the student learns the unique and deadly chokes and locks of the system ,which can render an attacker powerless in seconds.

    However,it is the undeniably devastating ground grappling which makes Gracie Jiu-Jitsu® one of the most feared and respected martial arts known to man."It's not like wrestling," according to Rorion Gracie."In wrestling,the whole object is to pin the attackers back to the ground.For a Gracie Jiu-Jitsu® fighter,it doesn't matter if you wind up with your back on the ground.The fight still goes on. As a matter of fact, there's alot you can do with your back on the ground."When a Gracie fighter applies there moves,it is almost like a chess game in motion. Every move or strike is instantly countered: each lock or hold can flow into another with astonishing sophistication.

    Gracie Jiu-Jitsu® is also uniquely characterized by "flying locks",where the entry into the hold is instantaneous. For example,an attacker may lead with a punch, only to find his arm and neck clamped into an unbreakable lock. He is then taken to the ground where the Gracie fighter may force a submission, or continue to administer punishment.


    What's the difference between Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Gracie Jiu-Jitsu?

    Simply, purity. As far as is known, only one other Brazilian learned Jiu-Jitsu from Maeda, and went on to teach. So, for the most part, the Gracies were the only source of Jiu-Jitsu in Brazil. Students of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu began teaching themselves, severing ties with the Gracies. Thus, Brazilian Jiu-jitsu was born. Some say Gracie Jiu-Jitsu, being the original Brazilian art, is in some ways more effective than Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. They say, "The water is much more pure if you draw it from the source." Yet others state that, "Gracie Jiu-Jitsu is old, the new style is Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu which is a more refined style because it is constantly evolving, developing, experimenting, and testing the art, science and style".

    The main difference between the Gracie style and the Brazilian style is that: The Gracie style leans more towards self defense in a real streetfight, no holds barred, and no rules fight. The Brazilian style is a more technical form leading towards the sport of it.
    The lastest evolution of the art is a form of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu which makes reality a sport, combining both disciplines and incorporates crosstraining martial arts.


    A knowledge of ground-fighting is therefore essential, not just for a complete martial arts background but also for self-defense. Carlson Gracie affirms that no other martial art addresses ground fighting as effectively as Gracie Jiu-Jitsu.


    Why this art is different from other styles:

    This art is different from most other martial arts in that it is very realistic in its training. Here are some of the main reasons why it's different and why this art is so effective.

    1) We train with the assumption that our opponent will most likely be larger, stronger, and know how to fight. This is opposed to many martial arts which assume the attacker will not be skilled at fighting.

    2) We fight exactly the way we train. We practice our techniques exactly the way we do them in a fight. This is opposed to many martial arts styles which spend hours and hours practicing forms which scarcely resemble what the person's body will be doing in an actual fight.

    3) We test everything we do by spending a great deal of time sparring under varying conditions against people with different types of training and different body styles. We spar reallistically in our club (full contact) and have rarely had a serious injury. We also test our abilities in competitions (both tournament Jiu Jitsu and no rules). This is opposed to martial artists who say that it is too dangerous to spar or spar realistically. So they don't.

    What's the story of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu?

    In the late 1800's a style of fighting was taught and practiced in Japan called Jiu-Jitsu. In 1914, Japanese Jiu-Jitsu Champions Esai Maeda and Inomata arrived in Brazil to help establish a Japanese immigration colony in that developing country. He was aided by Gastao Gracie, a Brazilian Scholar, a successful business man with strong political influence, and of Scottish decent.

    Having little money and being the representative of the colony, he wanted to give something in return. To show his gratitude, the oriental master taught the basic secrets of that ancient fighting style to Gastao's son, Carlos Gracie.

    Carlos became obsessed with the traditional Japanese methods and studied for four years. At the age of 18, he moved south to Rio de Janeiro and began teaching and in 1925 he opened the first jiu-jitsu Academy in Botafogo, a district of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Eventually, his brothers Osvaldo, Gastão Jr., and Jorge learned the art and trained with Carlos. Helio, being very weak because of cronic sickness, was forbidden to train by doctors, so he watched. One day when Carlos was late for class, Helio worked with the student because he knew the student's level. As they trained, Helio began to adapt the techniques to be based on leverage instead of strength. This began the transformation of traditional Jiu-jitsu into Gracie Jiu-Jitsu.

    Carlos, who was interested in street-fighting and was also a boxer, modified the classical techniques learned from Count Koma to meet the demands of a real, "no rules" fighting situation. Carlos then tested and refined his system through constant matches, open to all challengers. Advertisements were placed in newspapers and on street corners, challenging anyone and everyone, regardless of size, weight, or fighting style. Carlos was never defeated, and became a legend in Brazil.

    Helio became the most adept fighter in the family, and the mastermind in developing new techniques. Helio began teaching the classes himself, and Carlos was impressed. Knowing he had an able successor, Carlos retired from teaching and began studying nutrition.

    Over time, they developed their system into a very comprehensive fighting art, very seldom losing challenge matches. Helio then entered the professional fighting world, challenging Japanese Judo and Jiu-jitsu fighters, professional boxers, and professional brawlers. Two of his most famous bouts were the only two he lost in his life. Masahiko Kimura, 7th Dan, considered the greatest Judoka to ever live, was to be the first man to defeat Helio Gracie. Kimura boldly stated that if Helio lasted more than 3 minutes, he should consider himself the winner. Helio fought Kimura for 15 minutes before being caught in an armlock. Fearfull of having his brother's arm shattered, Carlos threw in the towel. Tremendously impressed with the little Brazilian, the Japanese masters invited Helio to come to Japan and teach, an almost unheard of request. Respectfully, Helio declined.

    Waldemar Santana was a student of Helio's, and a powerfully built stone cutter. Much younger than Helio, it is said that Santana purposefully waited until Helio was sick with the flu to challenge him. Against Carlos' wishes to postpone, Helio accepted, and lost after 3 hrs. 45 min.

    Helio quickly became the family's best fighter, and taught many champions. When Helio lost to Santana, Carlos, who managed his brothers' fighting careers, decided to let another family member step into the limelight. Carlson Gracie Sr. was chosen to retrieve the family's honor by fighting Santana. Santana accepted the challenge, and lost badly to Carlson. While Carlson quickly earned the respect of the fighting world, Helio dedicated his time to teaching.

    Carlson became the best active fighter in the family, fourth best in Gracie history and went on to produce an almost unbelievable record of over 600 undefeated fights. Now retired from the ring, Carlson's mission in life is to make champions. His "champion factory" in Brazil has produced some of the best black belts, and he hopes to produce the same level of champion at his Los Angeles Academy as well. Helio and his brothers taught many, and are still teaching, turning out the best Brazilian Fighters. They went on to further refine the art via constant no-rules competition, developing what is now known as Gracie Jiu-Jitsu.

    Rickson Gracie is widely accepted as the greatest Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu technician and the best fighter in the world, with a career record of over 400 victories and no losses.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Villa Constitución, Santa Fe, Argentina
    Age
    36
    Posts
    15
    Rep Power
    108

    Default What is Vale Tudo?

    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica
    I train Kung fu, traditional. The "boxing-fighting-competition" part of kung fu is San Da, it's pretty good if you like those kind of mmaa and trianing.

    I didn't know Jiu Jitsu had a brazilian branch. How is it different from the Japanese one?
    Y acá les dejo información acerca de lo que es el VALE TODO, la 2da pata de todo buen peleador de MMA. MMA= 50% Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 50% Vale Tudo.

    ¿Qué es el Vale Tudo?

    ¿Puede ser considerado un deporte? ¿Está más cerca de una confrontación deportiva o del Coliseo romano? ¿Es para cualquiera o para un pequeño grupo de personas decididas a arriesgar hasta su propia vida?
    Y por último, ¿puedo enviar a mi hijo a aprender Vale Tudo?
    Teniendo en cuenta que uno tiende a juzgar por lo que ve, sin informarse adecuadamente, la respuesta será probablemente negativa. Sin embargo, mi consejo es que nadie se apresure a sacar conclusiones. Sugiero que volvamos a empezar, esta vez por el principio.
    ¿Qué es realmente el Vale Tudo? Yo lo describiría como una confrontación deportiva, cuyo nombre no es del todo exacto, ya que lejos de “valer todo” está sujeto a un reglamento muy claro. Esta modalidad de enfrentamiento busca aproximarse lo máximo posible a la realidad -como tal es promovida- , es decir: se creó un reglamento sin muchas restricciones, para que los representantes de todas las disciplinas puedan expresarse sin impedimentos (a la vez que se evita que muchos se escuden detrás de ellos), y a partir de allí sepan, de una vez por todas, qué disciplinas y luchadores prevalecen sobre otros en un combate deportivo, es decir, reglamentado.
    Los resultados saltaron rápidamente a la vista, acaparando en principio la atención, los luchadores que dominan la lucha en el piso y, posteriormente, aquellos que además dominan la lucha en pie combinando ambas instancias. El Muay Thai, el Wrestling, la Luta Livre y el Jiu Jitsu brasileño son las disciplinas que se han impuesto por sobre las demás en cuanto a preferencias, para ser incluidas en el cóctel más efectivo de combates “sin reglas”.
    Con respecto al interrogante de si puede ser considerado un deporte, me pareció adecuado buscar la definición del diccionario y me encontré con la siguiente. Deporte: conjunto de los ejercicios físicos que se presentan en forma de juego, individuales o colectivos, practicados observando ciertas reglas.
    Si nos guiamos por esta definición, el Vale Tudo es sin dudas un deporte, puesto que comprende ejercicios físicos; puede decirse que la forma de jugar tiene que ver con la táctica y, como se había mencionado anteriormente, tiene reglas.
    Claro que para quien no considera el Boxeo como un deporte, el Vale Tudo va a estar todavía más lejos de esta definición, pero independientemente del hecho de que yo esté de acuerdo o no con estas afirmaciones, el Boxeo no sólo es considerado un deporte, sino que, además y para despejar dudas, tiene su versión olímpica.
    El rugby es más peligroso que el salto en largo, pero ambos son deportes. El Vale Tudo es más fuerte que la natación, ya que es un deporte de contacto, pero ambos pueden ser considerados deportes.
    Entonces, el Vale Tudo, ¿es para cualquiera o sólo para algunos “salvajes”?, si bien es común que exista, no hay ningún decreto ni regla que indique que el Vale Tudo deba practicarse inevitablemente, utilizando un contacto extremo y sin cuidados entre compañeros.
    Para este punto, sería coherente separar a quien desea dedicarse a pelear profesionalmente –y por lo tanto, necesita un entrenamiento más exigente- de quien lo hace con objetivos recreativos y de defensa personal. Yo mismo tengo más mujeres que hombres entre mis alumnos, debiendo tenerse en cuenta que los deportes más violentos no cuentan con mujeres entre sus adeptos; aún así, puedo asegurar que nadie que no tolere el dolor, debería exponerse a recibir un golpe de ellas.
    La clave está en saber cómo desarrollar la potencia sin que el compañero sufra las consecuencias, y cómo enseñarles a pelear, sin que se “maten en el intento”. Los mismísimos boxeadores tailandeses no entrenan lucha al máximo de su potencia (para no lastimarse y quedar imposibilitados de pelear) y eso que son los luchadores “más locos” que, probablemente, existen sobre la tierra; y esto no les quita potencial de pelea.
    De modo tal que, a modo de conclusión, el Vale Tudo es para cualquiera que lo quiera practicar, sabiendo que puede aprender correctamente, sin tener razones para creer que su físico corre riesgo (siempre y cuando el instructor lo entienda también).
    En lo referente a si uno puede enviar a su hijo a aprender Vale Tudo, adelanto que esta disciplina parece ser –y hasta ahora nadie la ha contradicho- la más efectiva combinación de técnicas para un combate sin armas contra un oponente dispuesto a acabar con uno como sea. De modo tal que el Vale Tudo se transforma en un excelente sistema de defensa personal (aceptando sus limitaciones en lo que respecta a un adversario armado); de todas formas, y refiriéndome a este último punto, el Sistema de Combate que nos compete está muy por encima de aquellas Artes Marciales que practican defensas contra armas (cuchillos, armas de fuego, etc.) de una manera tan ficticia como infantil y peligrosa, haciendo creer al practicante que con ese entrenamiento puede defenderse en un enfrentamiento real (para las defensas contra cuchillos, por ejemplo, me adentraría en artes filipinas y no en otras). Sin querer desviarme del tema principal, queda claro que el Vale Tudo es, probablemente, un buen sistema de combate.
    ¿Qué mejor que saber pelear para defenderse eficazmente?
    Por otro lado, es también un deporte, y la práctica de deportes en general trae aparejados innumerables beneficios físicos. (Al momento en que hablamos de preparación física, el lector comprobará que es posible considerar el Vale Tudo si no como el deporte más completo, al menos como parte de uno de ellos).
    También señalé que su práctica no tiene por qué ser violenta; esto depende en gran parte del entrenador más que del deporte que uno desarrolle. Así es como un entrenador de fútbol que tolere la violencia en sus prácticas, sin poner límites, puede generar que los jugadores se golpeen innecesariamente (produciéndose serias lesiones).
    Por todo lo dicho, queda claro que este Sistema de Combate cuenta con sobrados méritos y garantías para que un padre pueda llevar a su hijo a una de nuestras clases, como asimismo, para que cualquier persona adulta disfrute de sus muchos beneficios.





    *Extraído del libro de Rolando Carrizo Ortiz, Vale Tudo La Evolución de los Deportes de Combate, Editorial Kier, 2003.

  9. #9
    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    1,241
    Rep Power
    1817

    Default

    Hola jpablos80, seguro que me puedes contestar la pregunta:

    ¿cómo se dice la palabra en mma "takedown" en español?
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Villa Constitución, Santa Fe, Argentina
    Age
    36
    Posts
    15
    Rep Power
    108

    Talking Takedown o Derribo

    Quote Originally Posted by exxcéntrica
    Hola jpablos80, seguro que me puedes contestar la pregunta:

    ¿cómo se dice la palabra en mma "takedown" en español?
    Depende para quién estés realizando la traducción queda como TAKEDOWN o sino DERRIBO. Es lo mismo.

    Saludos!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •