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Thread: localismos comestibles

 
  1. #11
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    And yet we travel from country to country and nobody starves to death.

    In Brazil there's a common, nice, and tasty sandwich called americano. In Sao Paulo I invited a taxi driver and a lady to lunch. She ordered an americano, saying "Nunca comí um americano." The driver laughed at her joke, but she said I wouldn't understand. Well, the laugh was on her when I said I'd understood. "Comer" is Brazilian slang for "to have *** with".

    The americano had nothing in common with American sandwiches. Nor had I ever seen in my native California the "pizzas tipo California" that were common in Brazil. "California" implies that fruits are used. Yes, Brazil has fruit pizzas, ice cream pizzas, chocolate pizzas... You name it, Brazil has it.

    CHORIZO! That's another topic! Chorizo in many countries is a type of sausage. In Mexico it seems to be mainly lard and chile. It tastes great with eggs (or on a pizza), but you certainly don't make a sandwich out of it as in Argentina. Same name, quite different food.

    Longaniza is a tasty sausage in Guatemala, but off the top of my head I don't know of another country that has it. It doesn't seem to be known in Costa Rica, but I get the feeling I've read or heard the word elsewhere.

  2. #12
    Senior Member lauracipolla's Avatar
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    hola, hugo! excelente tu trabajo!
    algunos comentarios y aportes:

    bacon: tocineta (Arg, Col, CRica, Cuba, Pan, Prico y Ven), bacón, beicon, panceta, tocino (ahumado)
    (en Argentina le decimos "panceta")

    banana: plátano, banano, guineo (Cub), cambur (Ven)
    (en Argentina, "banana")

    sandwich: bocadillo (Esp), emparedado, bocata, sándwich
    (en Argentina, generalmente sándwich, y también, en forma "casera", "sánguche", aunque nunca lo escribimos así!)

    appetizer: entremés, aperitivo, tapas (Esp), botana (Méx), bocaditos (Perú)
    (acá nos gusta comer una "picada" [= tapas], antes de un buen "asado" [no es igual a una "barbacoa", pero da para un debate!] con muchos "productos de copetín" [= snacks], como papas fritas [= potato chips] y demás cosas saladas)

    filet mignon: solomillo (de ternera) (Esp); bife de lomo (AmL) /también "lomito" en Arg., el sandwich de un bife de lomo.
    (what about "steak" = "churrasco", "bife" en Argentina)

    pork: cerdo, puerco, cochino, marrano, chancho (Chi) (en Arg. también: pero "chancho" es para insultar suavemente a alguien que come mucho o mal, o hablar de animales vivos... la carne es de "cerdo")

    strawberry: fresa, frutilla (Chi) (en Arg. también frutilla)

    tripe: mondongo (Ven) (en Arg. tb), callos (Esp), pancita, guatitas (Chi), tripa, menudos

    se me ocurrieron, además: (no sé exactamente dónde se usa una u otra forma, excepto las que se usan acá)

    "pepper" (the vegetable, not the condiment) = pimiento, ají (Arg.), morrón (Arg.), chile (con todas las variantes: poblano, jalapeño, etc.) (Méx)

    "cherry tomato" = tomate "cherry" (en Arg.), tomate guindilla

    "zucchini" = en Arg., la misma palabra o "zapallito largo", y tenemos un "zapallito" que es de forma similar a un tomate, verde bien oscuro por fuera y amarillento por dentro. (en inglés también está el "squash", y aquí hay variedad de calabazas/zapallos: coreano, italiano, etc.)

    hugo, por favor, no dejes de pasarnos tu glosario cuando esté listo! y mientras tanto, seguiremos aportando!!!
    laura

  3. #13
    Moderator SandraT's Avatar
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    Thomas, this is related to your contributions

    CHORIZO! That's another topic! Chorizo in many countries is a type of sausage. In Mexico it seems to be mainly lard and chile. It tastes great with eggs (or on a pizza), but you certainly don't make a sandwich out of it as in Argentina. Same name, quite different food.
    In Spain it is a type of sausage and there are many types of chorizos. Since Cuba was colonized by Spain, of course we do have chorizo here and we put it on sandwich, on pizza, with eggs, in the pea soup, etc.

    Longaniza, we used to have it. From what I hear it was a very large type of sausage. We don't make it anymore but it is common to hear a domino player saying that he will play a longaniza or longana meaning that he will have the oportunity to play many times in a row.

    and laura, steak here it's known as bisté or bistec.
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

  4. #14
    Senior Member lauracipolla's Avatar
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    I love this thread!!! and as you say, Thomas, nobody goes hungry here...

    Funny thing, in some areas of my country (mainly in my hometown, La Plata), un americano is a cup of coffee served in a not-too-big mug, meaning a bit more of water for the same amount of coffee a small cup takes. The joke would work here, too, if we "ate" the americano (but as it's coffee, we "drink" it)! (I mean, the same slang meaning of "eat" works here.)

    We do have chorizos, as you mentioned, and the sandwich made of them (and very commonly sold out of a grill on the sidewalk, outside "fútbol" (soccer) games and discos) are called "choripán" (chorizo + pan, bread). There's also "morcipán" (morcilla, blood sausage, + pan).

    We do have longaniza here, too, among some other sausages. The pizza with pieces of longaniza on top of tomato sauce we call "calabresa". Hmmm... hungry!

  5. #15
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    laura, I love this thread too!!!
    we also have the choripan here and my son loves it!!!
    and regarding the americano, it's the same here. It refers to the watery coffee!!
    i'm getting hungry too!!!
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

  6. #16
    Senior Member lauracipolla's Avatar
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    sandra!
    another great thing about this forum... we've just "shared" a couple of choripanes and americanos!!!

  7. #17
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    The PEJIBAYE of Costa Rica is known as the CHONTADURO in Colombia. It grows in palmtrees and is about the size of a tennis ball. It is cooked in boiling water and then roasted. Costa Ricans love to put mayonaise on it, but they will put mayo on ice cream if you let them. To me it tastes like a raw potato. A major food for Indians, huaqueros says, ¨To find huacas, find pejibayes."

  8. #18
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    Entretenido hilo:
    algunos aportes, aunque sólo conozco las versiones chilenas y españolas:

    beetroot: betarraga
    sugar beet: remolacha
    En España se usa remolacha para ambas variedades

    pineapple: piña en Chile, ananá en España

    Zucchini: zapallito italiano en Chile, calabacín en España

    Sweetpotato: camote en Chile... no sé si en España lo conocen

    (en inglés no sé) Castañas de cajú en Chile, anacardos en España

    sponge cake: queque en Chile, bizcocho en españa

    ... y ya se me ocurrirán otros más

    Saludos

  9. #19
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    Default Re: localismos comestibles

    SandraT mentioned "americano" for coffee. In Costa Rica, "americano" is black coffee. Actually, most Americans put milk and sugar in their coffee.

    "Chorizo" here is a type of sausage (not the same as chorizo argentino), but... it also means "bribe", and a "choricero" is a corrupt person who accepts bribes.

    "Cas" is a fruit about the size of a tennis ball. It makes a wonderful lemonade-like drink. I have not found it elsewhere, but Colombians have talked about a fruit that may be a "cas" under another name. They call our "pejibaye" a "chontaduro". Same fruit, different name.

    "Guineos" and "chanchos" are small bananas. The "banano dátil" is larger and sweeter.

    "Gallo pinto" is red beans and rice. It is a little drier than the "gallo pinto" of Nicaragua. It tastes great, but it's not as good as the Cuban "moros y cristianos". I've never found beans as good as those of Cuba and Brazil.

    I do not know if the "manzana de agua" exists outside Costa Rica. It has a nice flavor, and it's smaller than the standard apple.

    In Bolivia there are about 200 varieties of potatoes. Some are as small as grapes.

    Writing this has made me hungry, so I am going to the "Aquí es Colombia" restaurant for a "bandeja paisa". (paisa = someone from the Medellín area / "bandeja paisa" is more or less the national plate of Colombia and includes rice, arepas, chicharrón, beans, avocado, ground beef, etc.)

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