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  1. #11
    Forum User walterzev's Avatar
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    Wink Re: cotorruda

    Jack,

    I am not talking about proper Spanish, because this word with this meaning is not proper, it is vulgar slang in several countries.

    I didn't mention any books either. I support my statement as a Spanish speaker and in my 24 years of experience as a profesional translator who has travelled extensively and corresponded with Spanish speakers form many areas of the world.

    I just answered a question, I tried to help. You are free to insist on any wrong idea with farfetched reasons. I am not going to argue with you.

    Have a nice weekend.

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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Your are too easily offended Walter! I was only having a discussion not attacking you personally. No offense meant!

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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Quote Originally Posted by JackMcG
    Your are too easily offended Walter! I was only having a discussion not attacking you personally. No offense meant!
    No offense taken, at all, really.

    I just didn`t see the point in continuing arguing.

    Take care.

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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Well, this was informative to say the least. I learned a couple of bonus words too!

    I understand what you are saying Jack. I can't relate to it so much in Spanish but in English, kids make up words "outside the box" that violate grammatical rules and even defy interpretation unless you are in on it. I know as a teenager we talked in a sort of "code"...certain words that we invented based roughly on an existing word but nobody else knew what the heck they meant...and could only guess, and that was the point. Had an expert linguist tried to decipher what we meant, maybe they could have, but probably not if they just had the word itself. So, I'm sure that still happens with younger people today in just about any language. That's the essence of slang...words/phrases formed without rules...and why we are always trying to figure it out...different countries, different generations, different social levels, etc. ...different interpretations and maybe none of them exactly as the inventor(s) of the slang originally intended it to mean.

    Same thing with gang graffitti and hand signs...they are meant to communicate with other members of the group and don't mean a thing to me and weren't meant for me to understand or figure out. So, in my opinion, anything is possible in the world of slang and an expert's knowledge and experience won't mean a thing in understanding a word/phrase that was just "invented" a month, a year ago or a couple of years ago and is just beginning to circulate outside the group that originated it. And the older you are the less likely you are to be able to figure it out.

    There is a phrase, "oh snap!, that has been around for at least a couple of years and I still don't know what it means exactly...and I speak English fluently, am pretty good at deducing the origin and meaning of nearly everything I hear in English...but obviously not all...because "oh snap!" makes no sense to me and although I have heard/read it a few times and think I have a sense of it's intended slang meaning, I could be wrong.
    Last edited by vicente; 03-06-2010 at 07:49 PM.
    vicente

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    Post Re: cotorruda

    Hi Vicente!

    I guess it all depend on the context.

    "Cotorra" = Parrot, that's clear for everybody.
    But down here, in slang it's also a synonym of vagina as Walter said.

    So if you hear something like: "Fulana habla como una cotorra" it means that "Jane Doe talks like a parrot" as Jack said.
    But if you hear: "Fulana es una cotorruda" or "Fulana tiene una flor de cotorra" it would probably mean about Jane Doe crotch.

    Hope this could be of help.

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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Vicente,

    Knowing the whole context would help, as you can tell the original intention. I believe you heard this word though from somebody originally from southern South America, (Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, Paraguay). Down there it is a derogative term, it is vulgar but not the worst (very vulgar in Uruguay, not so much in Argentina, and even less insulting in Chile), and it even though it literally means that the recipient has a big vagina, it is actually used along the same lines and meaning than we use a**hole here (mostly when referring in derogatory terms speaking about a third person that happens to be a female). She did something wrong, so this person would say "no puedo creer que te haya dicho eso, pero que cotorruda!"

    I can't imagine anybody using that word and not meaning a**hole. Cotorruda/o definitely doesn't apply for the parrot and it seldom used to refer to a big vagina, given that you're having a VERY, VERY, VERY vulgar conversation and you're referring unequivocally to the size of the vagina "era tan cotorruda que le bailaba adentro"

    Conchuda/o is a much more common word that even though it has the same derogative intention to people in the south of south america (Argentina, Uruguay, Chile and Paraguay), it is not vulgar and does have a different meaning for people in the north of south america, meaning lazy for people in Venezuela, Colombia and Peru for example.

    Do you know the general region of origin of the cotorrudo from whom you heard that word?


    Quote Originally Posted by vicente View Post
    Cotorruda. I hope this is not an obscene word.

    Anybody know what it means?

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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Do you know the general region of origin of the cotorrudo from whom you heard that word?
    Hello Omar!

    Thank you very much for your input!

    I posted this a long while back and I honestly do not remember where I heard or read it. But I am glad I asked and I know that it is a word that I am NOT going to use.
    vicente

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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Quote Originally Posted by vicente View Post
    Cotorruda. I hope this is not an obscene word.

    Anybody know what it means?
    Thanks for sharing. it's great


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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Quote Originally Posted by walterzev View Post
    Yes. The right meaning of "cotorra" is "parrot". But in slang is one of the many vulgar names of vagina.

    The ending "-udo, -uda" refers to big size. The RAE states:
    -udo, da.
    (Dellat. -ūtus).
    1. suf. En adjetivos derivados de sustantivos, indica abundancia, gran tamaño, o bien intensidad de lo significado por la raíz. Barbudo, carrilludo, cachazudo.
    Real Academia Española ©
    -------------------------------------------------------------

    Therefore, you can get the proper meaning of the combination of cotorra + uda.
    Not to offend anyone here but there was another word, I learned in Costa Rica, which there, only meant "little bug". The word is "bicho". It was so innocuous a word in CR that the female teachers called the male students this word on a daily basis when we would joke around in the classroom.

    But when I lived in Nicaragua, I found out quickly that I had to drop that word from my vocabulary as it too was extremely vulgar in the same sense of the word we are primarily discussing here.

    So I would imagine, that in some countries "cotorra" does actually mean "parrot" and/or "talkative" and with the "uda" suffix.. only means "big parrot" and/or "very talkative".

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    Default Re: cotorruda

    Hello walterzev!
    In what context are you hear this word?? =) How said Omar this world have different and absolutly inconsistent value =)
    I hope you hear about people, who speak very often, because in other way...it's a bad world and good man don't tell about it =)

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