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    Senior Member Dragona's Avatar
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    Default Pat on the back...

    Hello my fellow translators!
    I've gotten stumped a few times with this phrase and all it's variations:
    Pat on the back....
    Pat yourself on the back...
    give yourself a pat....
    Any ideas?
    I've usually completely replaced it with "han hecho un buen trabajo" or the like.
    But I would really love some help and suggestions!!!

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    Default Re: Pat on the back...

    Elogiar could work in some contexts

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    Default Re: Pat on the back...

    elogiar, si. he oido tambien "dar la enbuenahora" y "felicitar".

    hermit

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    Default Re: Pat on the back...

    Hi Hermit:
    I do agree with what our colleagues have posted above...So that might be of some help. Nevertheless, I'll give you a piece of advice to you and to everyone, cause I read many many people asking for the "right meaning". You will never find it unless you understand this principle of English Interpretation: the unity of meaning in English is "the whole text". Once you receive our help and have the one hundred possible meanings and have read the WHOLE TEXT, you and only YOURSELF will have to make up your mind which is the right one.
    Regards,
    Steppenwolf

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    Default Re: Pat on the back...

    I've also heard of "pat one's head" which means "forgiving", "patronizing", or even a gesture of "parental tenderness". It's quite similar to "pat one's back".

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    Senior Member Dragona's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pat on the back...

    Quote Originally Posted by Steppenwolf
    Hi Hermit:
    I do agree with what our colleagues have posted above...So that might be of some help. Nevertheless, I'll give you a piece of advice to you and to everyone, cause I read many many people asking for the "right meaning". You will never find it unless you understand this principle of English Interpretation: the unity of meaning in English is "the whole text". Once you receive our help and have the one hundred possible meanings and have read the WHOLE TEXT, you and only YOURSELF will have to make up your mind which is the right one.
    Regards,
    Steppenwolf
    Hi Steppenwolf,
    I am quite aware that many things don't do well in with literal translations.
    Welcome back=bienvenido espalda
    I was just asking for ideas or suggestions of what could be a similar saying in spanish.
    I ended up using this:
    So let's give ourselves a pat on the back!
    Todos deveriamos estar orgullosos de simismos!
    Thank you all for your suggestions!!!

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    Default Re: Pat on the back...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragona
    Hi Steppenwolf,
    I am quite aware that many things don't do well in with literal translations.
    Welcome back=bienvenido espalda
    I was just asking for ideas or suggestions of what could be a similar saying in spanish.
    I ended up using this:
    So let's give ourselves a pat on the back!
    Todos deveriamos estar orgullosos de simismos!
    Thank you all for your suggestions!!!
    Dear Dragona:
    Surely U don't make translations literally. However it's a natural tendency of native Spanish speakers to rush when translating word by word, instead of taking the trouble of reading the whole text. That's why we often get drowned in a glass of water because of an unknown word.
    Even the silly example of "Welcome back=bienvenido espalda " could be tricky, who knows if "Back" is a fiction character, appearing in a story!!!. Naturally, it's a silly example like I said. But still believe that it's worth taking a glimpse at the WHOLE TEXT before searching for meanings.
    regards,
    Steppenwolf

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