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  1. #1
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    Default domingo 7

    hello,

    Does anyone know how to translate this phearse into english:

    Cuidado con salir con tu domingo 7. Juan es un buen chico pero la vida exige...

    The speaker is refering to a young unmarried woman whom she suspects (correctly) is pregnant. Does anyone know if there is a similar phrase in English?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member mvictoria's Avatar
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    Default Re: domingo 7

    I do not know the English equivalent but perhaps my explanation might help. "salir con un domingo 7", is what you say to someone when you think they're about to give you a lame excuse for not doing something you're supposed to. "you'd better show up on Monday morning, no me salgas con un domingo 7" (don't make up excuses later).
    "Domingo 7" may also be an unexpected request or action from somebody.

    It might also be interesting to know the etimology of the expression. Any ideas?

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    Forum User Wolfgang's Avatar
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    Default Re: domingo 7

    Interesting explanation Victoria. I've never heard that one. I suspect it might a local expression, but I'm always interested to learn those . Care to tell us what country (or countries) use it?

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    Default Re: domingo 7

    Just as Maria Victoria says, that’s what it means Domingo 7. Now a days is particularly used when addressing a woman that is not supposed to get pregnant in a given circumstance, though she is. “Ya saliste con tu Domingo 7”, “You’re not supposed to be pregnant but you are”
    The origin of the pre Hispanic expression is a tale that you may find in the following link.
    http://www.g-world.org/magictales/domingo.html
    I think it’s really difficult to find any equivalent for this expression in any language different than Spanish in México.

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    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
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    Default Re: domingo 7

    Quote Originally Posted by Benilde Moreno
    Now a days is particularly used when addressing a woman that is not supposed to get pregnant in a given circumstance, though she is. “Ya saliste con tu Domingo 7”, “You’re not supposed to be pregnant but you are”

    Stunning. I would never have understood that. Native Spanish speaker from Spain.
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


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    Default Re: domingo 7

    There’s also a vulgar expression in México meaning the same as a joke, and I think that’s perfectly translatable and that may help Marle Elene: “te comiste la torta antes del recreo”, Torta stands in México for our local sandwiches.
    So Marle, we may request an equivalent for this joke “don’t eat your lunch before the break” when making reference to a pregnancy before marriage, or ya tienes un pastel en el horno “your cake is already in the oven”, which by the way I don’t know if it exist such an expression or equivalent in English. Let’s ask our native English speakers colleagues. Maybe Thomas or Wolfgang can help us out of this.

    The only other expression related to this subject, that I know in English is "she is with child" formerly in English and the equivalent in Spanish should be "ella está en estado de buena esperanza", but that wouldn't do in this case.
    Last edited by Benilde Moreno; 06-03-2009 at 06:15 PM.

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    Default Re: domingo 7

    hola benilde - yes, the expression in north american english is:

    "...a bun in the oven". quickly understood in the UK as well, i'm sure.

    hermit

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    Default Re: domingo 7

    Hi Hermit! That sounds perfect to me. A bun, yes. That sounds even tenderer.
    I would have written then “Don't you dare to screw it up with your bun in the oven. Juan is a good fellow, yet...”, is it understandable?, because Domingo 7 also means “you screw it up and we’re not so sure we like it”.
    I’ll look up for a better version of this tale. Ancient Mexican folklore also has ogres, fairies, elfs and goblins and so forth, but we called them differently. Those were not ogros, hadas or diablos. And, since it makes reference to the 7 days of the week, the tale should have been used by the Spanish for the local nations to learn their ways. The moral lesson of the story -la moraleja- is clearly "that should be what it has to be, but we don’t like it".
    Last edited by Benilde Moreno; 06-04-2009 at 02:57 AM.

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    Senior Member Dragona's Avatar
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    Default Re: domingo 7

    Personally I think "knocked up" is the better equivalent.

    *** is a nice guy, but don't get knocked up.

    A bun in the oven is more of a "happy" expression in being pregnant.

    No salgas con un domingo 7 = don't get knocked up.

    Just my 2 cents.....

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    Senior Member Dragona's Avatar
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    Default Re: domingo 7

    Quote Originally Posted by Benilde Moreno
    “Ya saliste con tu Domingo 7”, “You’re not supposed to be pregnant but you are”
    This expression is usually used in a not so happy tone.
    Therefore were I come from would translate into:
    Ya saliste con tu Domingo 7= You're knocked up

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