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  1. #1
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    Default travel experience

    I am translating my travel experience to spanish.Need some help..

    hot spots of the country from south to north
    - los puntos caliente del país del sur al norte.

    to board the 1:45 AM flight.
    - para subir al vuelo.......

    lot of confusion
    -- muchos confusión.

    we checked into the hotel -- what is for "checking in"?

    grabbed some bananas
    --algunos plátanos

    The train journey on the bank of the lake was awesome.
    --El viaje de tren en el banco del lago era impesionante.

    The beauty of the alpine panorama, quaint wooden chalet villages, vineyard-covered slopes and sailboats skimming
    across the blue waters are just beyond words.
    --La belleza del ........... están apenas más allá de palabras.

    After a long walk along the lake we reached the "Chateau de Chillon" castle.
    -- despues de que una caminata larga por el lago que alcanzamos el "Chateau de Chillon" castillo.

    Thanks in advance

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    hot spots of the country from south to north
    - los lugares más interesantes del país del sur al norte.

    to board the 1:45 AM flight.
    - para subir al vuelo.......para abordar el avión

    lot of confusion
    -- mucha confusión.

    we checked into the hotel -- what is for "checking in"?
    - nos registramos en el hotel

    grabbed some bananas
    --tomamos algunos plátanos

    The train journey on the bank of the lake was awesome.
    --El viaje en tren por la ribera del lago fue impresionante.

    The beauty of the alpine panorama, quaint wooden chalet villages, vineyard-covered slopes and sailboats skimming
    across the blue waters are just beyond words.
    -- La belleza del panorama alpestre, las aldeas con sus pintorescos chalets de madera, sus laderas cubiertas de viñedos y sus botes atravesando las azules aguas son imposibles de describir solo con palabras.
    O
    NO hay palabras para describir la belleza del panorama alpestre, las aldeas con sus pintorescos chalets de madera, sus laderas cubiertas de viñedos y sus botes de vela atravesando las azules aguas.

    After a long walk along the lake we reached the "Chateau de Chillon" castle.
    -- despues de una larga caminata alrededor del lago llegamos al Castillo de Chillon .
    Chateau: castle: castillo
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    Senior Member Dragona's Avatar
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    Question Bananas=Platanos?

    I'm confused...
    I thought bananas were bananas, sweet, yellow, maybe some spots, good to eat anytime.

    Platanos, need to be cooked to be eaten. some are hard and you can fry those and put a variety of condiments, etc....some are soft and sweet and dark in color, but those too, need to be cooked before eating.

    Is it a dialect thing?

    Because we say bananas for bananas.
    And platanos are in the banana family but are not eaten like bananas.

    ???
    Dragona

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    Moderator SandraT's Avatar
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    Hi Dragona!
    Here in Cuba they are all plátanos but have a last name.
    Now, what you call platanos for us is plátano macho ("male banana"). It needs to be boiled or fried or cooked in general, to be eaten.
    Your bananas is our plátano de fruta ("fruit banana). You can eat them without cooking as long as they're ripe.
    But in general we say plátano!!!!
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    Dragona,

    In Mexico bananas are platanos as I suspect they are around the world. Plantains (the hard ones you need to cook) are called platanos machos.

    Hope that helps.

    Joel

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    Senior Member Frank van den Eeden's Avatar
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    bananas - plátanos

    I think it's just the other way round :
    you eat the plátanos
    and the bananas you cook (or whatever, never tried it).

    We in our language DUTCH also call the plátanos "bananas"
    and we have a similar "fence-sitter" :
    Ananas = piña = pineapple
    (well...a bit beside the question, but perhaps interesting...)

    Have a nice weekend !


    GEE, Sandra T and Joel the detective seem to know it a whole lot better than me.
    Yet I eat a banana every day !
    In Belgium, we only eat the normal bananas, which are called plátanos in Spanish.
    And it seems I was wrong regarding the ones you bake...
    Last edited by Frank van den Eeden; 06-06-2008 at 02:40 PM.
    beste groeten - sincères salutations - kindest regards - atentamente - mit freundlichen Grüßen

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    Senior Member exxcéntrica's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Detective
    Dragona,

    In Mexico bananas are platanos as I suspect they are around the world. Plantains (the hard ones you need to cook) are called platanos machos.

    Hope that helps.

    Joel
    Hi Joel, in Spain the other way round.

    Plátanos: the Canary Island ones, sweet, some spots, yellow...

    Bananas: the ones you fry
    Los hombres son superiores a las mujeres porque Alá les otorgó la primacia sobre ellas. Portanto, dió a los varones el doble de lo que dió a las mujeres. Los maridos que sufrieran desobediencia de sus mujeres pueden castigarlas: abandonarlas en sus lechos, e incluso golpearlas.
    No se legó al hombre mayor calamidad que la mujer."


    El Corán (libro sagrado de los musulmanes, recitado por Alá a Maomé en el siglo VI)


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    Faxcinating! (Sorry for the play on your name, I should know better).

    I've never heard the work banana used in Mexico except when my niece was showing off her English. Aparently it's regional. Banana in Europe and platino macho in North America and the Caribean. Any input from Central and South America?

    Joel

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    Senior Member lauracipolla's Avatar
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    Default South America replying

    Quote Originally Posted by El Detective
    Faxcinating! (Sorry for the play on your name, I should know better).

    I've never heard the work banana used in Mexico except when my niece was showing off her English. Aparently it's regional. Banana in Europe and platino macho in North America and the Caribean. Any input from Central and South America?

    Joel
    in Argentina we only have "bananas", the fruit kind, that you just peel and savor. or you can prepare a "licuado" (banana + sugar + crushed ice + milk, in a blender... great drink!)

    I saw once a foreign cook (can't remember where she was from) preparing an "exotic dish" with the other kind (I've just learned they're called "plantains" in English), which she called "plátanos verdes" I think, and explained what some of you mentioned, that they're hard and don't taste well if eaten raw...

    to add to the confusion , in Argentina we have a tree --nothing at all to do with any kind of fruit -- called "plátano". do you know it?

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    [quote=lauracipolla]
    in Argentina we only have "bananas", the fruit kind, that you just peel and savor. http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thu...led_banana.jpg or you can prepare a "licuado" (banana + sugar + crushed ice + milk, in a blender... great drink!)
    Obviously, Argentinians are pretty savvy. Bananas are exactly that...yellow, sweet and peel-and-eat!

    And they are incredibly delicious in many dessert dishes like ice cream, banana pudding, banana creme cake, bananas Foster, banana split, etc., (yummm!!)


    I saw once a foreign cook (can't remember where she was from) preparing an "exotic dish" with the other kind (I've just learned they're called "plantains" in English), which she called "plátanos verdes" I think, http://www.boyds.org/images/platanos.jpg and explained what some of you mentioned, that they're hard and don't taste well if eaten raw...
    Once again, you are correct Laura!
    Plantains are plátanos which are very popular in dishes in my territory. I especially like them fried or baked with miel. And I've eaten those things in Hoffmann's recipe (the panqueques o tortas) and to me they were not very appetizing...a sort of hard, bland bread cake.


    Sandra: Do they grow bananas in Cuba?


    Joel: Plátanos are plátanos in Central America, at least so in Costa Rica, and bananas are bananos.


    Frank: Pineapples are also grown in Costa Rica and are called piños. Have you ever eaten pineapple upsidedown cake? Fantastic!
    Last edited by vicente; 06-07-2008 at 12:03 AM.
    vicente

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