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Thread: Military Service Order

 
  1. #1
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    Default Military Service Order

    ¿Cómo traducirían "military service order" en la siguiente oración?

    You need to bring your military service orders to your supervisor for review prior to commencement of the leave.

    Mi intento es el siguiente:

    Usted debe presentar a un supervisor sus notificaciones de servicio militar para que sean revisadas antes del comienzo de la licencia.

    De todas formas, "notificaciones" no me convence. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Moderator Jonatane's Avatar
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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    Yo creo que es simplemente "orden" la palabra porque no es una notificación. Una Orden de Servicio Militar es un papel que completa la persona que se pone en servicio. Creo que es así.

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    "ordenes del servicio militar"?

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    In this case it appears that the person is a member of a military reserve unit and is requesting a leave of absence (military leave) from his civilian employers in order to go perform required military duties. He is being asked to provide proof that the military is ordering him to report for duty.

    Coincido con Jonatane y daniela. I would go with orden...."ordenes del servicio military"
    vicente

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    Quote Originally Posted by estefaniar View Post
    ¿Cómo traducirían "military service order" en la siguiente oración?

    You need to bring your military service orders to your supervisor for review prior to commencement of the leave.

    Mi intento es el siguiente:

    Usted debe presentar a un supervisor sus notificaciones de servicio militar para que sean revisadas antes del comienzo de la licencia.

    De todas formas, "notificaciones" no me convence. Any ideas?
    En EEUU no existe el servicio militar porque todos los que sirven en las FFAA son voluntarios asi que yo no usaria el termino de "ordenes del servicio militar". Yo diria:


    Ud necesita mostrar su ordenes militares a su supervisor para que sean revisadas antes del comienzo de su licencia (militar).

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    Ayy Californiaman. Claro que existe el servicio militar en EEUU. No importa que son voluntarios. Hay servicio civil, no? y todos son voluntarios, no? Servicio no significa que es algo obligatorio. Casi todo el mundo dice "military service".

    Sin embargo, creo que "ordenes militares" suena mejor.
    vicente

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    Quizá podríamos cambiar "orden" por "Forma", "Formulario", "Planilla" para que no se confunda "Orden" con Acción y efecto de Ordenar.

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    Quote Originally Posted by vicente View Post
    Ayy Californiaman. Claro que existe el servicio militar en EEUU. No importa que son voluntarios. Hay servicio civil, no? y todos son voluntarios, no? Servicio no significa que es algo obligatorio. Casi todo el mundo dice "military service".

    Sin embargo, creo que "ordenes militares" suena mejor.
    A lo que me referia es que no existe un Servicio Militar (Draft) en el cual te reclutan lo quieras o no . Este tipo de "Servcio" o conscripcion si existe en otros paises de America Latina y muchos otros como Israel por ejemplo. Como en todo supongo que hay excepciones para todo para que algunos no sean llamados al "Servicio" militar.

    Por eso no creo que sea correcto utilizar la frase "Ordenes del Serivcion Militar" porque no se trata de ordenes de un "Draft Board"

    Entiendo lo que dices del Servicio Civil pero en mi opinion eso es otro uso de la misma palabra (Servicio).

    Saludos!

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    Ah OK...I wasn't considering the draft in your response.

    Still, my position would be that whether you are a volunteer or a draftee makes no difference once you are in the military. As you know, although serving in the military is voluntary in the U.S., once a person joins they are no longer free to do as they please as they would be in a civilian job. They are obligated to complete the contract they sign and until their "hitch is up" they do what they are ordered to do. All military personnel are guided by orders which determine where and when they go anywhere, such as in this case apparently. The person would have received written orders directing him/her to report for duty to a specific location at a specific time and date and that person carries those orders from one command to the next. Failure to obey those orders would result in disciplinary action. To put it another way, the person is being commanded to report for duty. I don't know what Spanish word other than "ordenes" would convey that "do it or else" condition.

    Saludos!

    Saludos
    vicente

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    Default Re: Military Service Order

    Quote Originally Posted by vicente View Post
    Ah OK...I wasn't considering the draft in your response.

    Still, my position would be that whether you are a volunteer or a draftee makes no difference once you are in the military. As you know, although serving in the military is voluntary in the U.S., once a person joins they are no longer free to do as they please as they would be in a civilian job. They are obligated to complete the contract they sign and until their "hitch is up" they do what they are ordered to do. All military personnel are guided by orders which determine where and when they go anywhere, such as in this case apparently. The person would have received written orders directing him/her to report for duty to a specific location at a specific time and date and that person carries those orders from one command to the next. Failure to obey those orders would result in disciplinary action. To put it another way, the person is being commanded to report for duty. I don't know what Spanish word other than "ordenes" would convey that "do it or else" condition.

    Saludos!

    Saludos
    I think we agree. Especially in the fact that once you are "in" the military (no matter how you got there) you a re commanded to report for duty wherever it is that they need you and you have very little leeway in disobeying the orders.

    I was trying to differentiate who the orders come from. If it comes from a Draft Board, I would translate that as "Ordenes del Servicio Militar". Otherwise I would translate it as "Ordenes Militares". This last phrase does NOT have the connotation of coming from a Draft Board.

    Greetings!

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