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Thread: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

 
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    Exclamation In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

    ...what is the jargon that would be used in Spanish to refer to a "joint" or length of pipe?

    Jaime

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    Default Re: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

    Would this refer to a specific length of pipe or simply a pipe?

    For Pipe you would say 'pipa' however if you are dealing with several lengths and you need a specific length then you would have to specify that.
    Last edited by Administrator; 07-01-2009 at 04:53 PM.

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    Default Re: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...


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    Default Re: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

    James I hope I'm not replying too late to this post but here is my 2 cents: "pipe in English" = "tuberia in Spanish" and "joint" as in to connect 2 pieces of pipes"= "codo" in Spanish"
    The word "codo" in Spanish is the same as "elbow" in English when it's in regards to pipes. For a long piece of pipe that is straight then in Spanish would be a "pedaso de tuberia", as in English would be a piece of pipe of any length, although I can see why it could be called a "joint" as it joins two other pieces of pipe. But Spanish is not as pliable as English, but in Spanish there are other words that are acceptable to use as: ensambladura, union, junta or pedaso in place of "joint" as a straight piece of pipe.
    I hope this helped a little...
    Good luck.

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    Default Re: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

    I have been a technical translator for about 17 years. A few years during that time I worked as an engineer for an oilfield equipment company, and before that I worked in Venezuela in the oil equipment business. Jamesmk (Jaime), you should have mentioned where you were posting from. In the oilfield as in real estate and in many other industries, the most important words are "location location location". It can make a lot of difference whether you're talking about Spanish in the oilfield in Texas, in Mexico, in Venezuela or Argentina. Copelandci, Spanish-speaking oil workers in Texas, maybe in California or northern Mexico might say "pipa" for pipe, but nowhere else. Nothing against people who do roughnecking or other physical labor, I respect that, but even in those locations "pipa" would mark the speaker as uneducated. Engineers and managers would not call it that, and you won't find it written down in operating manuals, training materials, catalogs, technical specifications, etc. In general, a piece of pipe (such as tubing) anywhere is a "tubo". In general, pipe is "tubería". ed_freire: You saw "joint", and assumed that the user was talking about a marijuana cigarette, and gave some Spanish slang. Did you actually understand the inquiry or are you trying to be funny? Levi, I will give you credit for trying to be serious. But the word you're looking for is "pedazo", not "pedaso". And people who work with it every day don't say "pedazo de tubería", they say "tubo". The other words you mention are good words (ensambladura, unión, junta) but they still don't mean what James needs. In regular English, a "joint" is the connection between two things, such as two pieces of pipe. However, in the oilfield it can mean just one piece of pipe, especially if it's tubing, casing, or drill pipe that is going to be lowered into a well. It sounds confusing, but it's not when you work with it for a little while. I hope this thread is not typical of the level of discussion that goes on in this forum, or it's a colossal waste of time. Not just for me, but for all of you. Steven Marzuola
    Last edited by mvictoria; 08-24-2009 at 10:57 AM.

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    Default Re: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

    Thank you for the professional response!

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    Default Re: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

    tramo.
    los tramos (tubes with a pre-established lenght) deberan estar unidos por reductores de 3/8 a 1/4 de pulgada.

    Pipes shall be fitted using reduction couplings from 3/8" to 1/4"

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    Default Re: In our Pipe Yard we refer to a pipe as a "joint" in English...

    I accept with information:In general, a piece of pipe (such as tubing) anywhere is a "tubo". In general, pipe is "tuberķa". ed_freire: You saw "joint", and assumed that the user was talking about a marijuana cigarette, and gave some Spanish slang. Did you actually understand the inquiry or are you trying to be funny? Levi, I will give you credit for trying to be serious. But the word you're looking for is "pedazo", not "pedaso". And people who work with it every day don't say "pedazo de tuberķa", they say "tubo".

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