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Thread: Further this Affiant saith not

 
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    Default Further this Affiant saith not

    ¿Cómo traducen esta expresión con la que termina una Declaración Jurada?

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    Default Re: Further this Affiant saith not

    No será "further affiant sayeth not"?

    Podría ser algo como "el declarante afirma no tener nada más que decir"

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    Default Re: Further this Affiant saith not

    I agree with Santiago. It is saying the person under oath has nothing further to add to the statement.


    Edit:

    Translation: Otrosí: El declarante no agrega más


    Explanation:

    Otrosí is the legal term used for further or moreover


    This translation was provided by Monica Colangelo
    Argentina
    Native speaker in Spanish
    with degree in Legal and Literary Translation
    Last edited by vicente; 02-12-2019 at 03:32 AM.
    vicente

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    Default Re: Further this Affiant saith not

    ¡Muchas gracias a ambos! Realmente se trata de inglés muy antiguo, imagino que es de la época de Shakespeare. Por eso es que la gramática es distinta, también.

    Sería algo así como el antónimo del Plain English. Les dejo comentarios al respecto (muy al grano) del Colegio de Abogados de Michigan:

    Nuts to Further Affiant Sayeth Naught

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    Default Re: Further this Affiant saith not

    Exacto. Supongo que esas declaraciones juradas, al ser notas legales, se mantienen con un inglés antiguo para darle mayor formalismo.

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    Default Re: Further this Affiant saith not

    En el mundo hispanohablante ocurre exactamente lo mismo.

    I completely agree with Bryan A. Garner, A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage:

    "American lawyers frequently end affidavits with some variation of this sentence: ‘Further affiant sayeth not.’ This sentence gives rise to three stylistic dilemmas: first, is it sayeth or saith; second, is it not or naught; and third, is the sentence necessary at all?... Among American lawyers who use the phrase, sayeth predominates; among American lawyers who rightly pride themselves on their style, the phrase does not appear at all... The predominant form [between not and naught] is Further affiant sayeth not. But this is nonsense, because it is literally translatable as, ‘The affiant says not further’... The form with naught, by contrast, makes literal sense... [But t]he best choice, stylistically speaking, is to use these phrases not."
    Last edited by reminder; 02-13-2019 at 07:34 AM.

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    Default Re: Further this Affiant saith not

    Quote Originally Posted by reminder View Post
    En el mundo hispanohablante ocurre exactamente lo mismo.

    I completely agree with Bryan A. Garner, A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage:

    "American lawyers frequently end affidavits with some variation of this sentence: ‘Further affiant sayeth not.’ This sentence gives rise to three stylistic dilemmas: first, is it sayeth or saith; second, is it not or naught; and third, is the sentence necessary at all?... Among American lawyers who use the phrase, sayeth predominates; among American lawyers who rightly pride themselves on their style, the phrase does not appear at all... The predominant form [between not and naught] is Further affiant sayeth not. But this is nonsense, because it is literally translatable as, ‘The affiant says not further’... The form with naught, by contrast, makes literal sense... [But t]he best choice, stylistically speaking, is to use these phrases not."
    Lawyers, like doctors, have their own form of writing, which sets them apart from the rest of us peones.
    vicente

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    Default Re: Further this Affiant saith not

    Hi, Vicente. It's always a great pleasure to talk to you.

    Many attorneys do break every single grammar rule learned (or not) at elementary school. As you know, basic writing skills are the foundations of communication. If attorneys cannot communicate effectively, they could certainly try their skills as farmers, why not?

    Please see below a short list of cases with the penalties assigned to the attorneys for poor writing skills.

    Penn State Law
    Last edited by reminder; 02-14-2019 at 12:17 PM.

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