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Thread: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

 
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    Moderator eidjit's Avatar
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    Question What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    I've heard this term in a TV Show called "Law & Order S.V.U."

    I don't quite the grasp on it's meaning though at least to make it more simple and less legal so i can then translate it and explain it to someone who doesn't have legal terminology knowledge.

    I found this on the web:
    stitch-up noun [ C usually singular ]
    uk /ˈstɪtʃ.ʌp/ us /ˈstɪtʃ.ʌp/ UK slang

    "​a situation in which someone is deliberately made to look guilty of doing something that they did not do"

    But on other ones it says something different, so I'm in a pickle of what really is.

    Could you forum gurus give us a little help?
    Last edited by eidjit; 07-13-2018 at 11:22 AM.
    _Eidji

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    Default Re: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    Literally "to stitch up" means to sew or join something together, with stitches, like one would get in surgery to close a wound.

    In current slang it means to manufacture, or "plant" evidence, or create circumstances that would make someone other than the real perpetrator appear to be guilty of a crime. In the past this was called a "frame-up".

    Sorry, I can't help with a Spanish translation. Es como un engaņo.


    Urban Dictionary: stitch up
    https://www.urbandictionary.com/defi...rm=stitch%20up

    A set up, a trick. If someone stitches you up, then they're playing you for a fool. It's often used when framing someone for a crime.
    Last edited by vicente; 07-11-2018 at 04:57 PM.
    vicente

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    Default Re: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    That's a great explanation vicente!

    In Spanish it would be incriminar, acusar, hacer la cama (extremely slang from South America), tender una trampa (also colloquial).

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    Default Re: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    Thanks Agustina

    I like "tender una trampa" in that it is colloquial, as is "stitch up".

    In the US, "to frame" someone is very widely accepted and understood, even in a court of law.

    I can't say the same about "stitch up". I never heard the phrase (in that sense) until eidjit raised the question.

    Do you think incriminar (falsamente) might be the best way to express it formally.
    vicente

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    Default Re: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    Absolutely!

    Here's a legal dictionary that explains the concept better:

    https://diccionario.leyderecho.org/incriminar/


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    Moderator eidjit's Avatar
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    Default Re: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    In a singular way, stitch up is like sewing something like:

    So I kind of understand the term, of planting something to "trap" or frame, or make someone take the blame for something.
    The needle and the thread of a PLOT like wise. Right?
    _Eidji

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    Default Re: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    First time I ever heard this word. But I agree "to frame" seems to be universally accepted in this sense.

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    Default Re: What does Stich-up mean, and how to translate into spanish?

    Are there any other legal jargon expressions you can think of?

    I find this topic extremely interesting!

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