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  1. #1
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    Default Allowances

    How can I translate the following phrases into an Spanish economical phrase:

    • Wives´ earned allowance
    • Age allowance
    • Personal Allowance
    • Child Allowance
    • Dependant Relative Allowance
    • Housekeeper Allowance

  2. #2
    Moderator SandraT's Avatar
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    the most suitable words in Spanish are Pensión, Subsidio, mensualidad, depending on the target country.

    It is also common to listen to Pensión Alimenticia de...

    Pensión de esposa
    Pensión por edad (avanzada) (o Pensión por Vejez)
    Pensión Personal
    Pensión para hijo
    Pensión por Familiar Dependiente
    Pensión de Ama de Casa
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    Hi Arien, in some countries these amounts do not correspond to "pensiones" but rather to a kind of (extra salary) bonus called "primas"
      • Wives´ earned allowance; Prima por cónyuge
      • Personal Allowance: prima personal
      • Child Allowance: prima por descendiente
      • Dependant Relative Allowance: prima por dependientes
      • Housekeeper Allowance: bono para servicio de limpieza
    The term "Age allowance" might refer to a “pensión de vejez”, but if it is an extra salary bonus I would not call it pensión but prima, since "pensión" is a benefit you receive after retirement or after you reach certain age being unemployed.

    Hope this helps


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    Moderator SandraT's Avatar
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    I agree some of the terms proposed by Hebe are a better translation into Spanish but you have to really make sure is an extra salary and not a pension. It not only depends on the country but also on the context; real meaning of the word in the context.

    The only translation I find rather odd is the Housekeeper Allowance since I have not heard of that before other than in the way I translated it. I would suggest some deeper research regarding this.

    In the case of the child, I guess it is not correct to use Prima, a child does not get a salary, so he/she could not get an extra salary. I would use "pension" or "subsidio" in that case.
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    Hi Sandra !!! A deeper research is the best advice. You a lady of wisdom indeed !!! I also found that term odd. At least I’ve never heard of a company that grants to their employees (not even key employees) an extra salary bonus for paying housekeeping. As for the child Allowance: (prima por descendiente) this is not a bonus that a child receives, but rather those employees who have children; in Venezuela teachers get an extra salary bonus (prima) for each child they have (son or daughter). It's a way to help them with expenses relating their children's education. Some employees even get car allowance . I would just love having some of those benefits

    Kind regards


    Truly, my dear young friends, you are a chosen generation. I hope you will never forget it.
    Gordon B. Hinckley

  6. #6
    Moderator SandraT's Avatar
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    Lightbulb How is it in other countries?

    You're absolutely right.
    In Cuba we do have a pension for housekeepers but it is kind of related to welfare and I am not sure if it's only for widows that are housekeepers (who never worked in their lives) so they get a pension from the government, a subsidy-kind-of and this is related to the salary his late husband used to earn.
    Here in Cuba, nobody gets anything extra for their children. In fact, the actual data shows that the Cuban population is getting everytime older, nobody wants to have kids anymore. So, what we have here is a Child allowance that the divorced father pays to the mother who has the custody of the child.
    I think we have started a very interesting information exchange here and it would be more interesting if other people would join and tell how things work in their countries. Don't you think?
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    Senior Member Hebe's Avatar
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    Definitely my friend!!!! Hopefully more people will get encouraged to partake in this information exchange. To me at least, this exchange has helped me a great deal in expanding my perspectives.

    Have a sunshiny day !!!


    Truly, my dear young friends, you are a chosen generation. I hope you will never forget it.
    Gordon B. Hinckley

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    The car allowance was a really good example because it is very common here in the US. Also, many companies offer childcare allowance or medical expense allowance to their employees. It would be like an amount that the company puts aside that the employee could use if needed but only for that reason. I guess if someone gets a housekeeper allowance then they are highly prized.
    Housekeeper is generally used for a maid while homemaker would refer to a stay-at-home mom or wife. It would be comically insulting to call someone's mom or wife a housekeeper.
    To just say "child" allowance seems odd to me though. It could be that someone is helping someone else create a budget or maybe the above case is for a divorce or legal separation case like Sandra mentioned.

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