+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: which one do you like better?

 
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    6
    Rep Power
    125

    Default which one do you like better?

    For english natives:

    Which one sounds more natural/appropiate/correct for poetry?

    1. "Walker, there is no road, you make your road out of walking"
    2. “Path walker there is no path, path is created by one´s walk”

    For those who are wondering where this phrase is from, I'll tell you. It's from Antonio Machado, a early twentieth century spanish poet very popular in hispanic literature. The original version is as follows:

    "Caminante no hay camino, se hace camino al andar"

  2. #2
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    1. "Walker, there is no road, you make your road out of walking"
    2.
    “Path walker there is no path, path is created by one´s walk”


    Hi jchavez,
    out of these two I like number one, but it might sound better to say something like, "walker/traveller, there is no road, you make your own road walking/traveling."

  3. #3
    Contributing User
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    170
    Rep Power
    210

    Default what about...

    Walker, there is no road. You make your own road by walking.

  4. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Buenos Aires
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    118

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmeromero
    Walker, there is no road. You make your own road by walking.
    de acuerdo...this sounds the most fluid.

  5. #5
    Forum User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    76
    Rep Power
    542

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jchavez
    For english natives:

    Which one sounds more natural/appropiate/correct for poetry?

    1. "Walker, there is no road, you make your road out of walking"
    2. “Path walker there is no path, path is created by one´s walk”

    For those who are wondering where this phrase is from, I'll tell you. It's from Antonio Machado, a early twentieth century spanish poet very popular in hispanic literature. The original version is as follows:

    "Caminante no hay camino, se hace camino al andar"
    Hola!

    No tengo ninguna experiencia traduciendo poemas, pero me he atrevido a traducir este. Creo que la palabra "caminante" se traduce mejor en este contexto como "sojourner" en vez de "walker". He puesto el poema en castellano primero para dar una idea al foro del contexto completo del poema. Este poema lo escuche como cancion hace cerca de 40 ahnos, cuando vivia en USA, lo escuche en la universidad de George Washington, en D.C. Es muy hermoso, la connotacion es diferente en ingles pienso yo - como todo poema, es muy dificil de traducir, ojala no lo haya malogrado.

    Caminante, son tus pasos
    el camino y nada mas
    Caminante, no hay camino,
    se hace camino al andar.
    Al andar se hace camino,
    y al volver la vista atras
    se ve la senda que nunca
    se ha de volver a pasar.
    Caminante, no hay camino
    sino estelas en la mar.

    Yo lo he traducido asi (con mil disculpas a los traductores/poetas):

    Sojourner,
    A road is nothing else but your footprints
    Sojourner, there is no road
    We create our own road as we walk along
    As we walk along, we create our own path
    And when we turn around
    We see the road that we will never travel again
    Sojourner, there is no road
    There are only trails on the surface of the sea.


    De nuevo, mil disculpas a los traductores/poetas, "I just had to give it a try!"

    El segundo verso es hermoso, algo como

    Murio el poeta lejos de su hogar
    Lo cubre el polvo de un pais vacio
    ...

    He escuchado la cancion tambien, la canta Serrat.

    Saludos

    Isabel

  6. #6
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,403
    Rep Power
    1157

    Default and the winner is...

    Walker, there´s no walk...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Veronica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    806
    Rep Power
    382

    Default

    There is one popular translation that says "Wanderer, there is no way,
    you make the way as you go."

    I like the last part but I don't like the word "wanderer" here, I think wanderer is someone who walks without focus, who just goes anywhere.
    Caminante gives me the idea of a person who is going somewhere.

    What do you think?

  8. #8
    Senior Member mvictoria's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    921
    Rep Power
    378

    Default

    I agree with Vero!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,672
    Rep Power
    3019

    Default Re: which one do you like better?

    Hola

    I just found this post.

    I love this poem and I have to say that I love Isabel's (Nira) interpretation. So well done!!

    It's true that a wanderer is a person who has no road to follow but that is the point. In poetry and song he is a person who is seeking to find something but perhaps does not even know what he is looking for.

    I think the poem is speaking to a wanderer because it tells him that he must not look to find an easy road already laid out for him...he must find his own way in the world...make his own path.

    In short, we are all wanderers in life and no two roads are alike.
    vicente

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    California
    Age
    66
    Posts
    17
    Rep Power
    177

    Default Re: which one do you like better?

    How about a mix of the two?
    Walker, there is no path, you make your own by walking!
    I also like Nira's use of the word "sojourner" better than "walker".

+ Reply to Thread

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •