+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Giddy up?

 
  1. #1
    Senior Member mvictoria's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    921
    Rep Power
    379

    Default Giddy up?

    Help! I'm looking for possible translations for the expression "Giddy up". I know what it means and I heard it many many times, but I cannot find a spanish equivalent.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,676
    Rep Power
    3149

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    Hi mvictoria:

    Maybe you could start with the origin of the phrase which comes from the terms "gee" (turn right) and "haw" (turn left):


    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/gee

    5.
    gee up, (used as a word of command to a horse or other draft animal directing it to go faster.)

    I'm guessing that there must be a number of phrases in Spanish for this command.
    Last edited by vicente; 04-28-2010 at 10:40 AM.
    vicente

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    107

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    Hi mvictoria,

    Hope this helps:

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=giddy+up

    Bye!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,676
    Rep Power
    3149

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    The word that comes to mind for me would be:

    ándele!
    vicente

  5. #5
    Senior Member mvictoria's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    921
    Rep Power
    379

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    thank you everyone!

    hi Vicente, Andale sounds good for Mexican spanish, is it appropriate for neutral, though?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,676
    Rep Power
    3149

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    Hi mvictoria...I don't know! You would know better than I.

    Giddyup itself is a phrase that is uniquely American slang (I think) that has evolved from it's origins as a command for horses and now means about whatever you want it to mean as an exclamation. I think some people say it just because they like the way it sounds.

    Depending on context and inflexion it can mean something or nothing. I think of it primarily as a phrase meaning, OK, let's go!...or, get it going!...or, go for it!, or, I'm in!, etc.

    In that case maybe, vamos!...jale!...or something like that. What is the context of your translation?
    vicente

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Age
    76
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    The word I have heard used for giddyup is ¡Arre! and for the animal to stop is ¡So! or ¡So So! I first saw this in a text book many years ago called "Camino Real'. As for the 'So So' - there is a popular song with the words ¡so so caballo!
    Last edited by rickey456; 06-22-2010 at 09:54 AM.

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    Quote Originally Posted by mvictoria View Post
    thank you everyone!

    hi Vicente, Andale sounds good for Mexican spanish, is it appropriate for neutral, though?
    Vicente is right...it would be depending on what you are translating...and it would be in an informal situation...So if you want it neutral, you would have to say Vamos! , i could have thousands of examples depending on the country and age , what would you use...but with informal things it would change ( there was a time in my country because of a character on tv everyone would say "vayamosle" ( it was from a Colombian soap opera, but it was so famous that everyone was using it...even it would change the expression for example, how many times you have heard that is so "cool"
    , not anymore 30 yo or younger are using "that is so sick!"

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,676
    Rep Power
    3149

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili Pazos Longart View Post
    Vicente is right...it would be depending on what you are translating...and it would be in an informal situation...So if you want it neutral, you would have to say Vamos! , i could have thousands of examples depending on the country and age , what would you use...but with informal things it would change ( there was a time in my country because of a character on tv everyone would say "vayamosle" ( it was from a Colombian soap opera, but it was so famous that everyone was using it...even it would change the expression for example, how many times you have heard that is so "cool"
    , not anymore 30 yo or younger are using "that is so sick!"
    Saludos Lili. Very interesting about "vayamosle". A similar thing occurred here in the U.S. The TV comedy "Seinfeld" that aired in the 1990s (and is still in re-run) had a character named Kramer and Kramer quite often used the phrase "giddyup!" as an exclamation. It had nothing to do with anything...just a word he used frequently. I'm afraid I'm too old to know what young people under 30 use these days. but I'm sure they have a replacement for "giddyup".

    Cheers!
    vicente

  10. #10
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Cordoba City - Arg
    Age
    43
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Giddy up?

    ¨Giddy up¨ is used as a word of command to a horse or other draft animal directing it to go ahead or go at a faster pace. The translation of this command will vary depending on the country... In Argentina this expression is translated as: Arre!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •