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Thread: tap, faucet, spigot

 
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    Default tap, faucet, spigot

    I understand that people in different parts of the U.S. use different words for the metal thing that water comes out of. In California, we usually say "tap". But I heard that back east, they're more inclined to say spigot. Is this true? What about faucet?

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    the only time I have heard spigot is when referring to a sprinkler or maybe where the hose connects to the house....i usually use faucet... tap we use to describe the water, (is this mineral or Tap water?)

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    Default Midwest English

    In Wisconsin we use faucet for that metal thing above the sink which provides water. Tap is often used for water. Although you get beer on tap, which refers to the tapper that is pounded into a keg. Wisconsin English can be odd, some people here still say "bubbler" for the water fountain from which one drinks directly. Bubbler refers to the antiquated form of drinking fountains which were unsanitary and no longer used. Spigot is usually outside and may even be on an old fashion water pump or fire hydrant.

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    Default cheers!

    thanks for taking time to respond. bubbler is one i have never heard.

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    Default "Canilla" and "grifo"

    You know what?

    We have the same problem in Spanish: while some Spanish speakers use "canilla" (Argentina, for example), others use "grifo" (Spain, for example).

    We share this language issue.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Maestra50
    In Wisconsin we use faucet for that metal thing above the sink which provides water. Tap is often used for water. Although you get beer on tap, which refers to the tapper that is pounded into a keg. Wisconsin English can be odd, some people here still say "bubbler" for the water fountain from which one drinks directly. Bubbler refers to the antiquated form of drinking fountains which were unsanitary and no longer used. Spigot is usually outside and may even be on an old fashion water pump or fire hydrant.
    jaja, it was good to hear "bubbler" again. I went to school for one year in WI and heard several strange things... someone one day asked me if I knew where the nearest time machine was. I guess that's what an ATM is! hehe.

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    ive heard "la llave" in spanish as well to refer to the tap.

    In Georgia we say "water hole."

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    Default Re: tap, faucet, spigot

    And to add to the confussion you can say " I filled my glass in the sink".

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    Default Re: tap, faucet, spigot

    In NY and MD we say tap or faucet.
    In spanish we say "de la llave".

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    Default Re: tap, faucet, spigot

    I'm from Connecticut, and I've almost always used "faucet," although "tap" isn't uncommon, either, especially when referring to "tap water". I've never heard the word "spigot" used in conversation, though.

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