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  1. #1
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    Red face amenable

    Hi! I have trouble with these sentences. I would like to know if the adjectives and nouns are correctly used:
    - He is a very good employee.What´s more, I admire his treat to customers, always amenable and useful.
    -If I am talking about someone reliable, I am talking about his dependability.
    -That is such a dependable car engine.That is such a reliable car engine.

    Another question: which is the difference between partener and partner?
    I´ve looked for it in the dictionary and I´ve found them like synonyms.

    Thanks in advance.

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    Hola maramaras:

    - He is a very good employee.What´s more, I admire his treatment of customers, always amenable and useful (helpful).

    Another way to say this would be "I admire the way he treats customers. He's always amenable and....".


    -If I am talking about someone reliable, I am talking about his dependability. Correct

    -That is such a dependable car engine.That is such a reliable car engine. Both sentences are correct!

    Another question: which is the difference between partener and partner?
    I´ve looked for it in the dictionary and I´ve found them like synonyms.

    I am not aware of such a word as partener in English. At least I have never heard it. Which dictionary did you find it in?
    Last edited by vicente; 05-26-2008 at 01:37 AM.
    vicente

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    Another question: which is the difference between partener and partner
    Perhaps you refer to Partenaire which is a French word.

    Personne et/ou organisation avec laquelle on collabore pour atteindre des objectifs dont on a au préalable convenu ensemble.
    www.idrc.ca/fr/ev-43631-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    Thanks, Vicente and Sandra T.
    I cannot remember which dictionary I found partener and partner, but in the word in context in Answers, I´ve just found this, like examples:
    'My sons ex partener is a mannic depressive " or Partener On-line provides a consolidated view of your life insurance policy. ... or You keep tou your word and give up. your partener starts smoking again
    But I suposse they are wrongly written, perhaps by teenagers. Thank you for the help. Seeing you in next posts!

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    'My son's ex-partener is a mannic depressive " or Partener On-line provides a consolidated view of your life insurance policy. ... or You keep tou your word and give up. your partener starts smoking again

    But I suposse (suppose) they are wrongly written, perhaps by teenagers. Thank you for the help. Seeing you in next posts![/quote]

    Yes, it is very poorly written. Keep up the good work maramaras! You are doing great!!
    vicente

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    Wink so much

    Hi, everybody! Thank you, Vicente, for encouraging me with my learning.
    I would ask you about the usage of so much, which I have the only meaning as tanto, like here:
    Since you know so much about it, why do you ask so many questions? or John has partied so much during his life!He knows well about it.
    But in these cases, and in so many others, I cannot understand the meaning:It is from a newspaper, I am giving the context:
    DISH WEEKLY- So much more on 104: De Vine Wines will host the second installement of its seasonal travelling programe next Tue, June 3. Touring the city´s 104 Street district, ..........

    So much for education........All Simon Mubenga wants is a job offer.With the shortage of skills in the country, this highly educated man..........

    Well, if somebody would help me with this. My best wishes for all of you

    [FONT='Verdana','sans-serif']





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    Hi maramaras! Welcome back!

    In the case of so much for, I'll try to put an example.

    You are looking for a job in X and after so much trouble, you finally find it but at the end it turns out to be something you were not expecting. YOu are dissapointed. So, here you can say, "so much for a good job in X"
    It means you are dissapointed. In this case I would say something like (informal)
    !Tanto lío por un trabajo en X!
    other ways to express this in Spanish, are subjected to the context but it's common to hear, taking your example on education.
    !Así que la educación! Menos mal que la educación es importante/necesaria/...depends on the context
    !Pues vaya con la importancia de la educación!
    Y luego dicen de la educación.
    Al diablo con la educación.
    I could write a few pages on examples and their possible translations. it depends on the context, mostly. I suppose there are other expressions in other countries as well.
    Hope I was of some help!
    Realmente, el destino del mundo depende, en primer lugar, de los estadistas y, en segundo lugar, de los intérpretes.
    Trygve Halvdan Lie

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    I would ask you about the usage of so much, which I have the only meaning as tanto, like here:

    Since you know so much about it, why do you ask so many questions?
    Another way to say it: "If you are so well informed, why do you ask all these questions" (bien informado)

    or John has partied so much during his life!He knows well about it.
    "John has been such a party-boy during his life!" (tanto)

    But in these cases, and in so many others, I cannot understand the meaning:It is from a newspaper, I am giving the context:

    DISH WEEKLY- So much more on 104:
    "Lots more, or more information, on 104" (mucho mas)

    So much for education........All Simon Mubenga wants is a job offer.With the shortage of skills in the country, this highly educated man..........
    This phrase, as Sandra explained, loosely means (remember loose/lose? ) something does not go well in spite of..a pesar de...of all efforts. It also means "that's it!, it's over!".

    It's a phrase that expresses sarcasm, disappointment, frustration, resignation, failure, etc.

    Ex. You are going to wash clothes but realize you have no soap, or the washing machine is broken. You say "So much for that!" or "So much for washing clothes!"

    Ex. You try to make friends with a new neighbor but she is indifferent or hostile. You say "So much for trying to be friends!"

    Ex. You are educated and seek a job in your field but another less-qualified person gets the job. You say "So much for education!" or "So much for experience!"

    Ex. You watch a man trying to climb a ladder but he keeps falling off. You say "So much for effort!" or "So much for determination!"

    There are endless ways to use this expression.

    Saludos!!


    Last edited by vicente; 05-29-2008 at 05:13 PM.
    vicente

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    Thank you again, Sandra T and Vicente.
    I send you some sentences of my own, to see if I´ve understood your explanations.
    Reading two hours a day will not suffice to learn a language. You should read in bulk to obtain more from your effort.
    [FONT='Eras Demi ITC','sans-serif']If you take so loosely your preparation, you might lose your chance to qualify for this exam.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Eras Demi ITC','sans-serif']So much for passing the test! In spite of his trudging for it a load of hours, he couldn´t get the title. It´s over![/FONT]
    [FONT='Eras Demi ITC','sans-serif']I think one of the circus tiger is on the loose. The police behaviour is being undoubtedly rare for these moments.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Eras Demi ITC','sans-serif']Excuse me for my attempts to write in English. I expect your corrections.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Eras Demi ITC','sans-serif']Sincerely yours.[/FONT]

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    Reading two hours a day will not suffice to learn a language. You should read extensively to obtain more from your effort.

    "in bulk" means "a lot" but usually refers to something tangible like a commodity, such as commercial quantities of food or materials.

    If you take so loosely (OK) your preparation so loosely (Better), you might lose your chance to qualify for this exam.Very good!

    So much for passing the test! In spite of his trudging for it a load of hours, he couldn´t get the title. It´s over!
    I'm not sure about trudging for it a load of hours. I'm sure you meant he struggled for many hours (or something similar), and he couldn't get the title so your use of "so much for passing the test" is perfect.

    I think one of the circus tigers is on the loose. Perfect! The police behaviour is (delete being) undoubtedly rare for these moments.


    En total...muy bien hecho maramaras!
    vicente

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